https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria924998

What do you do to practice? (Japanese)

Hello! This is my second time around trying to learn Japanese, and i would love for it to stick this time. However i am finding that im recognizing patterns that Duolingo is asking for rather than learning individual words or order of characters.

I find myself guessing far too often for my comfort without really "knowing" what the answer is. I feel this isnt really me learning the language; to be able to craft fully formed thoughts in the language.

Overall i guess im asking what habits people have out there to truly retain what you are learning outside of this platform. Rather than treating this like a game you blast through and forget.

I also would love to speak Japanese but I dont have anyone to chat with irl or feel im good enough atm to ask others online.

1 month ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Firetrix

When I am studying or practicing Japanese, I "forget" English so to speak, by trying to immerse my thoughts into the language. One strategy I use is to think of words as synonyms of an English word. For example, the English word water is a synonym for the Japanese word mizu (水). Additionally, I practice by speaking Japanese to myself, even if it's just a word. Like when I see an object that's white I try to identify it by the term in Japanese so in this example shiro (しろ). Beyond, that I try to immerse myself in the culture as much as possible through Japanese media which can include translated news from Japan. I think learning about the culture itself is a great asset in acquiring any language because it helps to see the world through the eyes of a native speaker. Furthermore, I use an app for teaching me how to write the characters and practice with the characters by typing in Japanese. Eventually, I will start using a conversational Japanse textbook to further my studying. I don't think one can rely on Duo alone to master any language but I think it's a great tool for laying a foundation.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria924998

This is actually really helpful advice to use on a day to day basis. I will focus on working in some of these!!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoupandPie
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For me, I like to learn languages like I'm playing a RPG; quests and goals. And having a clear reason that you absolutely need the language for will help to stick to learning Japanese as well. Like, reading novels in Japanese that you know will never be released in any other languages, or living in Japan for extended periods of time.

Some of the goals I like to make in order of longest to shortest to reach are:

  1. Reach native level in Japanese.

  2. Reach literary fluency in Japanese.

  3. Reach conversational fluency in Japanese.

  4. Reach JLPT N1.

  5. Read a full novel in Japanese.

  6. Have a full conversation in Japanese without interruption.

Then I like to set quests to help me reach those goals, and some of the learning resources I use are Shin Kanzen Master for grammar, Memrise and Anki for vocabulary, immersion through media, and a private teacher for speaking practice, grammar, and additional motivation. (imo, spending your actual money, and having a regular scheduled meeting with another person will motivate you way more than having only yourself to learn through free resources.) If you have some extra money, I recommend going through getting a teacher as well, because even if you aren't good at speaking, your teacher will be able to help you through it from the beginning, and it's never too soon to practice speaking, even if you are at day 1.

I like to set quests for myself like:

  1. Memorize 25 words a day, excluding all the reviews you would do if you use Anki or Memrise.

  2. Look at the grammar exercises and concepts that you might have had a hard time with the teacher, and familiarize with them every 2 days.

  3. Watch a show or read any sort of reading material as often as you can bear, I personally use Raw mangas, anime, drama and Japanese forums, and add the words you might not know or remember into flashcard apps. Initially it will be impossible to understand anything, but as time goes on, you'll see a lot of repeated words and it will also give you a better understanding if you are making improvements.I personally don't write down anything by hand, since handwriting is kinda useless these days, but if handwriting works for you better, that's also good.

  4. Speak or communicate with native speakers, and try to do it daily. If you want to improve speaking, there is absolutely no other way than to speak with people that actually know the language fluently. Preferably they should be people who can correct you if you are wrong, and also speak at least one another language that is in common with you fluently as well. For example, I speak English and Korean, so what I might be looking for is someone who is learning English, speaks Japanese and Korean so we can have a common language to explain or try to get help from.

That's all my learning process, but another thing I do to really retain my Japanese is to go to Japan. Because I go to Japan twice a year, it allows me to actually use Japanese in practice, and also motivates me to improve by the next time I go to Japan.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenSamson82

I completely agree. But learning a language is not enough for me. I also read books on the history of Japan, their traditions, cuisine, etc. It also helps to understand the language, as you understand how the Japanese think and feel.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ningyo.M

I think you should have mentioned the fact that you go to Japan twice a year, at the begging of your comment :)) that alone can keep one super motivated.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria924998

Going to Japan is SUPER motivating. There are good habits in here though. Ill work on adding some of these to my life!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenSamson82

I compiled vocabulary and phrase stock absorbing content in Japanese such as anime, games and movies with subtitles. It Helps a lot.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria924998

How did you go about that? I find that if i listen to anime they talk fast and im only able to gather maybe a word or two. (maybe my vocabulary isnt big enough?) I started trying to find more toddler - grade school songs or shows to hopefully learn more, but i didnt have much luck

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenSamson82

If you do not have the ability to quickly read subtitles, then pause the video and read the subtitles, unpause etc.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria924998

Lmao no reading is fine. Correlating what word they say that goes with the word I read is the problem

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ayshabelem

I have the same problem. I stopped doing Duolingo for a while because it just became a struggle to retain anything because I was just guessing or making patterns out of the lesson and not understanding it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenSamson82

First you need to read educational literature to understand how sentences are built. Then you watch your favorite anime and try to match the subtitles and what the characters say in Japanese. Next, write the sentence in a notebook in the form of English transcription and at the very end write a sentence in the kana. Remember the phrase and words. Go to the next phrase, etc.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victoria924998

This is a much better explanation thank you!!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ningyo.M

what we need is a show or anime or whatever with Japanese sub, which I can't find :(

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenSamson82

It is better to watch with subtitles in the native language. It will be easier to learn.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlgaBab1

First watch it with your native subs, then with Japanese subs, then without any subs at all. And maybe start not with your favorite anime, but the one aimed at younger audience, they would use simpler words and grammatical structures.

1 month ago
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