"Kamu mengecewakan Ibu."

Translation:You are disappointing mother.

January 5, 2019

14 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fra877649

It seems to me weather a comma or an "a" are missing in the EN translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaRRC

You disappoint mother?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

Does this English sentence sound a bit strange?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serfive

Seems fine to me. However, referring to your mother with just 'mother' instead of 'my/our/your mother' can feel odd indeed. It is still correct however


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzfleisher

I think this sentence sounds natural in english, but it js the type of sentence that can change based on whether there is a comma. Without a comma, it means that mother is being disappointed. But if the sentence was "You are disappointing, mother." it would be telling mother that she is disappointing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FZausHH

I wrote "you disappointed mother" and got marked correct. I guess it shouldn't?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mario_Fez

"You disappointed mother" should be correct. You were marked appropriately :)

You disappoint mother - You are disappointing mother - You disappointed mother. All of these and more can be represented by "Kamu mengecewakan ibu", depending on context.

As long as [you] are expressed as causing [mother] to be disappointed, then it fits the translation for mengecewakan here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arkonide

Somewhere else in this lesson I saw that Ibu meant 'you'. I am confused here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/burndownforwhat

My understanding is that it can be either. Ibu is both the word for mother and a formal way to address a woman. In this case I believe it can only mean mother but 'Ibu Kecewa' could mean 'mother is disappointed' or 'you are disappointed'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arkonide

Thank you for the explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

It sounds like fictive kinship, wherein those in a society refer to others in familial terms to indicate respect, affinity, membership, or sometimes just as a cultural norm.

Additionally, some languages (like Indonesian) use these kinship terms as a form of direct address; in some cases, using the standard second-person pronouns might come off as too familiar, so you replace kamu/Anda completely with the kinship title; while English requires the "you" ("Do you want to try some, ma'am?"), Indonesian will use those kinship terms (or a person's name) like a second-person pronoun Apakah Ibu mau coba?, literally 'yes-no mother want to-try?.

(edit: Come to think of it, I've seen Downton Abbey-type servants address their masters in the third person: "Would madam care for a cup of coffee?" "Sir must attend to his royal duties." "Milady will have her jest." So we do have examples of addressing someone present by third-person pronouns to indicate extreme formality in English.)

So there are circumstances where Indonesian uses Ibu that English would translate as "you."

But in this sentence, we have already established a "you" with kamu, and since the verbal prefix meNG- suggests a subject-verb-object order, Ibu here must refer to a third party--after all, "you disappointed you" would sound very unusual in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doubletops1

This is an option to write, 'you are disappointing mother'. Would this be marked wrong?

Learn Indonesian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.