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  5. "John Doe" in Other Languages

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mededogen

"John Doe" in Other Languages

Here's another list of equivalents in other languages. I'd have to say my favorites here are Slovak and Hebrew lol.

Afrikaans: Piet Pompies, Jan Alleman

Arabic: (Fulan AlFulani, Fulana[h] AlFulaniyya[h]) فلان الفلاني / فلانة الفلانية

Bosnian: Mujo Mujić, Petar Petrović, Marko Marković

Bulgarian: Петър Петров (Petar Petrov)

Croatian: Ivan Horvat, Hrvoje Horvat, Pero Perić

Czech: Jan/Josef Novák, Eva/Marie Nováková

Danish: Anders Andersen

Finnish: Matti Meikäläinen, Maija Meikäläinen

German: Max Mustermann, Erika Mustermann

Hebrew: Israel Israeli, Israela Israeli

Hindi: Rajwinder Kaur, Pappu

Icelandic: Jón Jónsson, Jóna Jónsdóttir

Italian: Mario Rossi

Japanese: Yamada Tarō (山田 太郎 or やまだ たろう)

Kannada: Aparichita (ಅಪರಿಚಿತ)

Korean: Hong Gildong (홍길동)

Polish: Jan Kowalski, Janina Kowalska

Serbian: Petar Petrović

Slovak: Jožko Mrkvička (lit. "Joe Little Carrot")

Slovene: Janez Novak, Janez Kranjski

Spanish (Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador): - Juan Pérez, N.N

Swedish: Sven Svensson

Vietnamese: Nguyễn Văn A, Trần Thị B

January 5, 2019

41 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ignatznkrazy

Interestingly enough, Spanish borrows fulano from Arabic for what could be translated into American English as "so-and-so."

fulano, na

Del ár. hisp. fulán, este del ár. clás. fulān, y este quizá del egipcio pw rn 'este hombre'.

  1. m. y f. U. para aludir a alguien cuyo nombre se ignora o no se quiere expresar.

  2. m. y f. Persona indeterminada o imaginaria.

  3. m. y f. Con referencia a una persona determinada, u. en sent. despect.

It's interesting to contemplate the effect the Umayyads, Almoravids, and other Muslim dynasties had on Spanish.

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guaybana_elBravo

In Puerto Rico we use Juan del Pueblo or Fulano de Tal.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/issa.mile

Don't forget zutano and mengano :D

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diecidieci

Funny, Hong Gildong is basically the Korean Robin Hood.

I'm not 100% sure how to translate the Finnish word "meikäläinen" but it can mean "I", or "something that is from us or belongs to us".

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eetu_Kupila

Correct. The word "meikäläinen" is used when you are referring to yourself. It's not commonly used anymore (if it ever was).

for example: "Meikäläinen on väsynyt = I am tired"

and the official way to say the same thing: "Minä olen väsynyt = I am tired"

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diecidieci

Yeah, exactly --- but "I" isn't the only meaning the word has, and I'm not sure what's the exact simple translation for the other meaning/s.

Like "meikäläinen ruoka on hyvää" (= ??? basically means that the local food is good) or "hän on meikäläinen" (= s/he is one of us.)

= "something that is from us or belongs to us" is the simplest translation for the other meaning/s that I can think of right now...

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelcioCesar

Brazilian Portuguese: Fulano, João da Silva

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juliette780952

Ou Maria de Jesus!

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel589120
January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMarsh764255

Good suggestion, but did you know that "John Doe" was first used in the late 12th century (Norman French) in England to illustrate how a new law would work. I forget the exact details but in legislation about the rights of landlords, tenants and sub-tenants, examples were given to illustrate the new law, and John Doe was one, I think Richard Roe might have been another... and I'm afraid I forget the third.... I suppose we all assume it's American now.

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConorHoughton

Sean Citizen in Ireland

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gyorokpeter

The Hungarian version is Gipsz Jakab. Samples for credit cards etc. usually have some common names on them such as Szabó István, but some time ago Minta János ("John Sample") was also common. My favorite of this kind was a loyalty card that had the sample name Szuper Áron (Aron Super) - which can also be interpreted as a phrase meaning "at a super price".

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anyom

my school used Xenia Xerxes (in danish)

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snak3bite

In swedish: if it's an unknown person N.N (nomen nescio) is used (e.g. unidentified dead body). Sven Svensson might be used about the average swedish citizen, but not very common.

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gunnar388832

Agree, "medel-svensson" is Average Joe/Jane rather than John/Jane Doe

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsakNygren1

Most colloquial in Swedish are Medelsvensson, Svenne Banan, Nisse i Hökarängen etc.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/onshisan

Russian: Ivan Ivanovich (John Johnson) - there are other options for this, but I believe this is probably the "classic".

Wikipedia has a great list of "placeholder names" : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_placeholder_names_by_language

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windsaw

Interesting, but there is a question what is "equivalent". For example the german example is only used in forms or documents. You won't find it in death certifivates of unknown peoples.

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmseiple

I'd be curious to know how they each say "Tom, Dick and Harry" as well. I know Italian uses "Tizio, Caio e Sempronio" and Spanish (at least in some regions) "Fulano, Mengano y Zutano."

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

In French, that would be "Pierre, Paul et Jacques".

Our "average Joe" is Monsieur (ou Madame) Dupont :)

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cleanthe3

Hi Vabelie, and do you know if we have this term of "John/Jane Doe " , I can't think of anything ...?

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

Apart from "Monsieur/Madame X" (possibly used for unidentified bodies or people found without identity or memory, but I'm not even sure), I don't think of much either…

Happy New Year, Cleanthe :)

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cleanthe3

There are so many documentaries/shows on TV about the work of the police, they probably talk about it ... but I never watch them ! ;))

Une bonne année et plein de bonnes choses à toi aussi Vabelie ;)

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

I'm the same: I like crime shows mainly if they have some added value, like a historical context :)

January 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

They were names of 3 tortoises Charles Darwin snatched off the Galapagos Islands. Harry turned out to be female and was renamed Harriet. She retired to Australia to a tortoise retirement village and died in 2006 at age 175. My favorite TDH story.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArpsTnd

I was about to answer "Susmaryosep" (Jesus, Mary, Joseph) because those were the iconic three in Filipino expressions, so maybe those three were the Tom, Dick and Harry. But I was wrong, well, I guess (I may be wrong), we don't have such a term in our native language. Unless you accept the "SusMaryOsep"

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snak3bite

This is a compilation in Italian. It is not spot on what you are asking for, but I suspect that in many languages there is no exact match. I know in Swedish there isn't. https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinco_Pallino

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hm437e

In German: Hinz und Kunz, (as in „Er verkehrt mit Hinz und Kunz“ - "He goes about with every Tom, Dick and Harry") where Hinz and Kunz are abbreviations of Heinrich und Konrad.

when used as „von Hinz zu Kunz“ it means “from pillar to post”.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dornne

In Brasilian Portuguese we say "Fulano, Beltrano e Sicrano"

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seito9

John Doe in Japanese is Nanashi no Gonbee (名無しの権兵衛 or ななしのごんべえ). it's used for unknown name. 山田 太郎 is one of the most popular names and used for an entry example :)

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juliette780952

せいとーさん、ありがとうございますありがとうございます, will you transcribe the 2nd one into hiragana too ください?

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toutousmile

無名氏 (a nameless person) in written Chinese In Cantonese, we also use 阿豬 (Ah pig)、阿狗 (Ah dog) when it is not referred to a dead body. In public exams, Chris Wong is used as the gender-neutral nobody and all students hate Christ Wong. But my favorite is definitely 蛋散 (A deep-fried dough), as 蛋散 will crumble in your mouth easily, it becomes an euphemism for 'nobody'.

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenna517810

Very interesting post. I'm glad you posted this!

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMarsh764255

In Ireland such things were often used as means of oppression and are best consigned to history and forgotten. Sean Citizen sounds good.

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chilotin

In Spanish, besides Juan Pérez, Fulano de Tal and Perico de los Palotes. Other expression for unknown persons are "Fulano, Zutano y Mengano/Perengano" and "Pedro, Juan y Diego".

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArpsTnd

Who is John Doe? Is he the "Uncle Sam" type of placeholder name? Well, he is "Juan de la Cruz" in Filipino. Yes, you've read it right Filipino, although it looks like Spanish.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xitric

Wow. Sounds like a bad-guy's name in children's movies

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArpsTnd

It literally translates to "John of the Cross" in Philippine Spanish tho.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prisonmike420

I'm so late to this thread but... I'm Bulgarian and I never knew that John Doe is equivalent to Петър Петров. In movies here they always say it John Doe and I never even thought about a Bulgarian equivalent lol. I guess Petar Petrov is the most common male name here so that's why (even tho I always though Ivan Ivanov is more common?). Now I wonder what's the female name equivalent. Jane Doe in Bulgarian should be... Petya Petrova? This is very interesting.

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/breadroll04

juan doe

January 9, 2019
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