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  5. "E nānā ʻoe iā Keoki."

"E nānā ʻoe Keoki."

Translation:Look at Keoki.

January 6, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRGB

This video link may help all of us get a better understanding of "iā Keoki".

Watch time segment (9:37 to 11:54) of the video | Ka Leo ʻŌiwi | Episode 4. This is a great tool used together with duolingo.

Link: https://youtu.be/Q02LDJVetQ0


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesWil267432

She is reading this sentence in the intonation of a question, but it is not written as a question. This is important because intonation is the only way you can tell that something is a question in spoken Hawaiian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DABurnside

I agree with you that the intonation is often the difference between statement and question, but I am noticing more and more younger English speakers raising their pitch at the end of statements so that it sounds like they are asking a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesWil267432

Aloha Burnside! The point was that the way she is reading it, a Hawaiian hears: "Should you look at Keoki?" instead of "Look at Keoki". Mahalo for your ike!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

I am not sure how to read a command form as a question. For example, "Watch the dog" as opposed to "Watch the dog?" The command form might not make much sense without more context. "Watch the dog?" implies "[Do you want me to] Watch the dog?" which is a different sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DABurnside

Good point. I donʻt have any sound with this one so I canʻt comment on that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesWil267432

Sorry about that! I'm just on google. Some they read out loud; some they don't.

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