https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageBoss22

Á, É, Í, Ó, Ú In The Hebrew?

Ó as in ‘órez’ or ‘אוֹרז’ meaning rice

Why are they different from the normal a, e , i , o and u? I have a suspicion they might be longer vowels but I can’t really tell.

Thank you!

1 week ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/simply_rin

this is normal in hebrew due to the fact that א takes the sound from either other letters or from the nikud. it doesn’t exactly equal a. therefore, it is taking the sound from the ו. and no, it isn’t a longer vowel. unlike arabic, hebrew doesn’t have long vowels. good luck!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GidiZisk
GidiZisk
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Many two syllable nouns in Hebrew have the stress on the first syllable (male/female/plural m/plural f),

אורז - orez - rice

אוכל - ochel - food

בוחן(/נת/ים/ות) - bochen(et/im/ot) - tester

שוטר(ת/ים/ות) - shoter(et/im/ot) - police officer

It is also true for verbs conjugated to the past tense

אכלתי - achalti - I ate

בלעתי - balaati - I swallowed

ראיתי - ra-iiti (ii not as y but like the name of the letter "e" ) - I saw

Most of the times (in general not just in those cases) the stresses are close vowels and not open (maybe the word חרגול - chargòl - grasshopper, is an exception that I can think of, but it is really rare to find such words in my opinion).

I think that in most other cases, the stress is mostly second to last.

If you meant to ask something else/more specific, feel free to ask

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IngeborgHa14

There is no phonemic length difference in Hebrew. אֹ֫רֶז is pronounced ['orez]. Maybe there is a stress mark in your transliteration.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageBoss22

It is listed in the Duolingo course in notes

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asafwr
Asafwr
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It's very weird if it appears in the notes, because not a single Hebrew speaker I know can distinguish between אֹ֫רֶז and אורז. This can indeed be a stress mark, or just a way to emphasize the fact the normal Hebrew pronunciation generally has longer vowels

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpells
MissSpells
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I think this site explains it really well: http://www.cartoonhebrew.com

The duolingo course leaves out the nikkud most of the time, but I think if you understand them it helps.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simcha613
simcha613
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nikud are used as vowels which are only showed in the course if there is another word that is similar

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asafwr
Asafwr
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There are no longer and shorter vowels in Hebrew, they are all about the same length, and all can be considered long in English terms.

What the Á, É, Í, Ó, Ú vowels could mean is that the stress mark is at the beginning of the word (called Milra, מלרע), unlike many other words. While there is no difference between אֹ֫רֶז and אורז, there certainly is a difference between אורז when the first syllable is stressed (=rice) and when the second one is stressed (=[single male] is packaging). It might be technically correct to pronounce these words the same way, but it would sound very weird and unnatural.

1 week ago
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