https://www.duolingo.com/SusanDara

What exactly is das Bargeld and uses?

SusanDara
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I have signed up for Transparent Language German word of the day and today's word is das Bargeld as cash / money.

Is this an common word in Germany? Would this be more correct than Euro or just Geld? Is this slang?

It is an interesting word and a cool literal translation, but if I use it in conversation or ask to pay for something in cash at a coffee shop or bakery would I be speaking correctly?

Also would I use the preposition 'in' or 'with' to make a correct sentence or would Duo's phrase Bar bezahlen cover all of this or am I just everything this?

1 week ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/he_47
he_47
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It means coins and notes and it's a very common word. For example in a Restaurant you are always asked if you want to pay with credit card or with cash (Möchten Sie mit Karte oder in Bar bezahlen) and you can aswer 'cash please' (In Bar/ Mit Bargeld , bitte)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannibal-Barkas
Hannibal-Barkas
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Germany is cash country. You see coins and notes more often than credit cards. Smaller amounts, say up to 30 Euro I generally pay in cash. Again, I personally use mostly the "EC-Karte" (maestro) and rarely a credit card. In Germany, Visa and Master card are more widely accepted than Diners or other more rare ones.

I would say "in bar" when asked how I want to pay rather than "mit Bargeld" (Native from Southwest Germany)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chooyo
chooyo
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I hardly ever hear Bargeld used but I'm in Berlin and it just may be regional. I'd very seldom / almost never use Geld separately unless in financial circumstances but that's just me.

As said before, Bargeld is a bit more fancy to my ears unless used in a different context.

A standard conversation sitting in der Eckkneipe / im Café:

Ich: Bezahlen bitte (I'd like to pay now)

Kellner/in: Ja / Moment / Natürlich frustrated shake of the head (yeah, I know)

Kellner/in: Getrennt oder zusammen? (separate or together for the check)

Ich / Uns: Getrennt. (separate ... more normal than not in my area)

Kellner/in: In bar? (in cash?) (or just Bar oder Kreditkarte?)

Ich / Uns: Bar ...(pay) Stimmt? (Yes, is the amount I/we gave you ok? )

Kellner/in: Ja / Danke schön. (Thanks)

Ich / Uns: Tschüss / oder Ciao (Bye)

A native speaker may be able to help correct this since I go much more my ear than writing

ETA: I don't post here much but I do hate this editor - the spacing always comes out wrong! Sorry.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsiehler
jsiehler
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Put two spaces at the end of a line.
Then the spacing will come out how you want it.
It took me forever to figure this out for posting dialogues like this.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/he_47
he_47
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Maybe it's regional because here (in my region) it's used oftenly

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeleRakete
AdeleRakete
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Ich/Wir: In Bar bitte... Stimmt das so? (to ask the price) or Ich/Wir: In Bar bitte... Stimmt so! (to say that a tip is included)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpongeOver
SpongeOver
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Strange. In Potsdam Bargeld is used everywhere (the term as well).

Interesting how different neighbouring Bundesländer can be. :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chooyo
chooyo
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Definitely ... in Neukölln I don't hear it so much though if I'm up in Kreuzberg or Prenzlberg I might hear it occasionally.

Even from Kiez to Kiez, you can hear different things used or emphasized ... I love the diversity!

(and yes, I've really got to get out one warm sunny day and see Sanssouci - I hear it's beautiful and only an S-Bahn away)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpongeOver
SpongeOver
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They don't call Potsdam the Versailles of Germany for nothing!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeleRakete
AdeleRakete
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No, no it’s not regional. It’s a common word. You just need a reason to use it. Like: “Hast du Bargeld dabei? Ich habe nämlich nur meine Karte mit.”

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chooyo
chooyo
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Ok, then I need better speaking friends and Sprachpartners :)

Common conversation for me is "Hast du Geld (/ Bargeld)? Ne, nur meine Karte" ... totally Umgangssprache but it works.

I agree that it is a common word and everyone understands it - I just have limited reasons to use it in my daily interactions.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeleRakete
AdeleRakete
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That’s right, you really need that special reason, like if you undoubtedly want to let somebody know “I just have cash, nothing else”.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LexiJPGabi
LexiJPGabi
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It is a nice and handy word indeed. Heres some usages:

"Bargeld" = "cash money" -> "Wir brauchen mehr Bargeld" - "We need more cash" (like, we need an ATM)

"Barzahlung" = "cash payment" -> "Sie werden nur eine Barzahlung akzeptieren" = "They will accept only a cash payment"

"Barzahler" = "cash cutomer" -> "Barzahler sind mir am liebsten" = "I like cash paying customers best"

A Phrase you will commonly hear, probably is "Nur Bares ist Wahres" ("only cash is the real thing") - when once again you are in a shop and they will not take a credit card, as is often the case in Germany, you will not find the rime funny at all, of course - but otherwise it is a nice to know idiom :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pinsch3
Pinsch3
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Please note the difference in writing:

With a capital letter:
Barzahlung
Bargeld
Bares für Rares ("Cash for rare things", tv show, see youtube)

Without a capital letter:
bar bezahlen
in bar
bar

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/he_47
he_47
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Or you can ask in a shop if you can pay with credit card or only with cash (Kann ich mit Karte zahlen oder nur mit Bargeld/ in Bar)

Of course the expression 'in Bar' is used much more because German people are very lazy and it's shorter than 'mit Bargeld'. Nevertheless I'd say 'Bargeld' is a very political word. Headlines like 'Das Bargeld wird abgeschafft' (cash is abolished) you can read in many newspapers oftenly.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanDara
SusanDara
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You can just say Karte? You don't need Kreditkarte? That's so cool and quick. Nice and succinct and direct. As a visitor would I look like I'm trying too hard if I take a shortcut like this? Would I look like a pushy tourist?

Ich möchte mit einer Kreditkarte bezahlen. Order Ich möchte mit einer Karte bezahlen.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dirk858585
Dirk858585
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If you look like a tourist you can use "Ich möchte mit Karte bezahlen" without being asked for details... People would guess you will use your credit card. Some shops will ask for what kind of card, as they do not accept credit cards but "debitcards" like "girocard" and vice versa.

About bar/Bargeld :

I would use "Ich zahle (in) bar" in a restaurant, but if I need cash, I have to say "Ich brauche Bargeld". Something like "Ich brauche Geld" is something I would ask my boss ;)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chooyo
chooyo
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Again regional, but for me, in supermarkets and many shops, once you get the "Alles" prompt and you say "ja" you get a price / number shot at you. Then your reply is either "mit Karte" or just "Karte" and then you get shown the device to put the card in (or use NFC) and all is good or "nur Bar" and you go for hard cash.

This is for medium to large stores / supermarkets ... if you're going to buy food at the Saturday markets or some restaurants, your going to have to pay in cash. (there are signs in some stores saying you have to buy 10 Euros or so to use a card so you must pay a bit of attention)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanspersson
hanspersson
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Any German saying "Das Bargeld wird abgeschafft" should try a vacation in Sweden. We have restaurants that don't even accept cash, only card and app payment. In Germany, trying to be a tourist on card payments is shaky at best.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert-Alexan
Robert-Alexan
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Some in Germany have the notion that Bargeld is preferable over electronic money. I think it's fair to say, that supporters of Bargeld are not from a specific political spectrum, social class, region or generation. And many different reasons are stated for this idea. Some say Bargeld won't allow the government or corporations tracking their shopping behavior (thus location, intimate preferences, family size, etc). Others say that Bargeld is a fast, flexible and simple payment method, that doesn't need any physical IT infrastructure to function. Some shop owner claim that cash payments are faster and cheaper. Others openly admit that they don't want to lose the ability to buy illegal stuff with Bargeld. Others fear the future, in which every payment is subject to taxation. Other somehow have the notion that coins are a tangible asset, that are a cornerstone of a strong currency with low inflation. Some state that only tangible money allow them to regulate their spending behavior, while electronic cash easily leads to unwanted overspending and unsustainable debt. Some state that Bargeld is safe while credit cards and electronic accounts are prone to hacking and theft. Some fear corporate monopolies of private corporations like Mastercard, Google or Apple built around money which was supposed to be a "public good" issued and controlled by public authorities.

Is that convincing? Well, judge for yourself...

1 week ago
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