https://www.duolingo.com/Langophobe

Geben Triggering Dative In Set Expressions?

I know Geben triggers dative for the object following it but does that hold after the expression "Es gibt...". Would it be "Es gibt einem Mann" oder "Es gibt einen Mann"? Thanks in advance.

1 week ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Robert-Alexan
Robert-Alexan
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Well, there's geben and then there's geben....let me explain....

  • Er gibt dem Mann ein Buch The recipient is always in the dative case. That what is given is associated with the accusative case. And you are right, in most (or all?) circumstances the "dative object" (=recipient) is mentioned before the accusative part. However, there are sentences with no apparent recipient. Like Er gibt ein Fest or er gibt einen Hinweis. In this case the "accusative object" follows the verb.

  • Es gibt is an idiom. Don't connect it to the verb geben. That would be misleading. It simply means there is, there are or it exists. This idiom is always es (never er or sie) and it's always singular, never plural (not sie geben). The expression es gibt always points to an object. This object is always in the accusative case. It can be either singular (like es gibt einen/den Mann) or Plural (like es gibt (die) Männer). es gibt can even mean there will be or there's going to be like in the phrase es gibt Regen. It's not raining yet, but it will start raining (soon).

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dirk858585
Dirk858585
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Really nice explained ;)

Do not get confused by:

"Siehst du das Mädchen? Es gibt dem Mann ein Buch"

Even more difficult to decide without context (that's why I added the question...) would be:

"Es gibt ein Fest".

I don't want to add confusion (did I?:), just another example for difficulties in case of a missing context...

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert-Alexan
Robert-Alexan
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Well, you are right. I somehow failed to explain that es gibt could also be meant in the first sense I described above, when the acting subject is a neuter noun or pronoun. (like in your example das Mädchen>es gibt dem Mann ein Buch)

It may be confusing to read es gibt ein Fest w/o further context. At first sight, it's indeed tricky to decide what is meant, but think about it:

  • Es gibt ein Fest in the idiomatic sence would be appropriate when saying something like Es gibt ein Fest in München, das Oktoberfest genannt wird. It just indicates that somewhere a folk fest exists, that...
  • For es gibt ein Fest like in the first sense I described above it's hard to come up with an example. It means something like it gives/throws a party. Who could be the es? An animal with unknown gender? Ein Geist (a ghost)? Ein Mädchen? Even in the latter example most people would instead say Sie gibt ein Fest although das Mädchen is neuter grammar-wise.

To sum up: most likely it means There's a festival....

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dirk858585
Dirk858585
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Wow & Hehe - nothing was really wrong before, I like your detailed explanations everywhere. About the "Es gibt dem Mann ein Buch" - I just imagine you wrote "Rule" 1 & 2 in that order.. it's fine ;)

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Langophobe,

Robert gave you (as always) a well-founded, wonderful answer.

I just want to add that you can hear in daily routine the expression 'da gibt es...' It means almost the same like 'es gibt' as Robert explained you in in example2. 'Da' includes a place. 'Da gibt es Regenschirme (Hüte, Schuhe)' if you point at a place.

best regards, Angel

1 week ago
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