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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hyruliandeadpool

Just Curious

Nothing important here, but in my Italian journey I seem to get "ragno" which means spider and "arancia" which means orange, mixed up all the time. I'm not pressed, but I thought it was funny and wanted to know if anyone else has encountered the same experience or something like it?

January 9, 2019

23 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diecidieci

Not quite the same but: Back when I was traveling in Italy and barely knew any Italian, I used to get confused when people used the words "ho", "hai" and "ha" because somehow my brain always thought that "ho" referred to me no matter who the speaker was, and "hai" and "ha" referred to other people. (Because that's what the words mean when I'm the one talking.)

Also, for some reason my brain often mixes up "leukemia" with "celiac" while chatting --- both in English and in my native language (leukemia & keliakia) --- even though I'm very aware of what the words mean... :' )

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottGud

Personally, for me I cannot get caldo and cold out of my mind. I know the difference but my first reaction is always cold.

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda7Italian

Ciao Scott. I concentrate on the freezing freddo which makes me remember what's hot:-)

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ymous1

I remember it because in spanish caldo means soup, which is hot :)

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda7Italian

Ymous. Ah, now that helps me with my Italian. Calda zuppa. Grazie!

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.Igor

When I speak in Italian about seasons Spanish 'verano' comes first and couple seconds later Italian 'estate'. For me in Spanish these antonyms are more logical 'verano - invierno' than Italian 'estate - inverno'

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

Maybe Spanish native speakers may find confusing these words, because araña and naranja are similar.

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julian_L.

It was never confusing to me when I have learnt the word «ragno», it even has the "ñ" sound. What might be confusing for native Spanish speakers is that «ragno» is masculine while "araña" is feminine.

What was a newness to me, it was when I have seen the word «arancione», and then «arancia».

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

Arancione or arancio is the colour of an orange (arancia).

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julian_L.

«Arancio»… That colour surprised me once again.

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda7Italian

Hi hyrul. I often use mind-pictures, eg. I RAN away from the ragno. Arancia I have no problem with as ragno is now easy. Uovo - egg (not grape) because the ovo looks like a bird's beak and eyes, and an egg obviously comes from this bird. This releases me to remember that uva = grapes. Incredibly after many years I still have to think about Destra e Sinistra so just slow down a bit. Auguri...

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trev756863

It's funny how we all relate to different words. I remember Sinistra from my brother. He was an evil S-o-B and he is left handed - sinister. Shouldn't really confess in here, not appropriate but one small window into my crazy life. Tanti e memoria.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda7Italian

Trev. Mi hai fatto sorridere! A dopo...

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynnich

Hi Linda! I remember "sinistra " because it sounds like "sinister" and people used to say that left handed people were sinister and then destra is the other one! I was helping friends remember right and left by saying "you write with your right hand" (unless you are sinister-and then it doesn't work)

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda7Italian

Ciao Lynnich! Brava, another good one to remember. Mille grazie. Giovedì e Venerdì = Joe on Thursdays, Vera on Fridays;-)

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janie898466

I used to mix up bacia and brucia, two words that are definitely not anywhere near the same thing.

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dru_Morgan

I speak Spanish too, and even though I know both words in three languages now, I literally made that mistake today :)

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/italyking

Not with those particular words but I do get le and lei mixed up. They sound the same. I can understand where you are coming from though.

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marpole

I get those mixed up as well.

I note the following: Spanish - araña  Portuguese - aranha French - araignéeè Also, arachnids. Yet, Italian: ragno

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimDiggle

They are all derivatives of "Ariadne", the mythical daughter of the Cretan King Minos. She was in charge of the labyrinth containing the Minotaur to which Minos offered sacrifices in the form of doomed humans.

When Theseus arrived on Crete he was immediately condemned to be a sacrifice but Ariadne fell in love with him and offered him a sword as defence and a thread to mark the way back out of the labyrinth.

As a result of this Greek myth the thread producing creatures were named after the protagonist of this story in Ancient Latin and thus in most Romance Languages (though not the Germanic languages!)

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/golightly23

When i was taking an Italian class I would write che as que...always.

When we first moved to Rome, my husband was talking with our portiere and instead of saying, "you rake all day" (because he is always raking leaves) he used a derogatory word for sex in place of rake. The Portiere responded, "sarebbe bello."

And yesterday at the store I asked the sales clerk if she had a blanket for my pot instead of a lid.

January 10, 2019
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