https://www.duolingo.com/dokks_2

"Aloha e ke keiki": Why use "ke"?

So there is this one sentence I sometimes have to translate during a lesson that kind of confuses me. I understand that "Aloha e ke keiki" means "Hello child" but I'm wondering why "ke" is in there. Is it because you are speaking to 'the child' so that's how you address them? I'd love to know because this one is kind of confusing me.

2 months ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jegge4
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Is just says that you are talking to a specific child, not a child.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesWil267432

it's just a Hawaiian thing when you are addressing someone by some types of titles: teacher, student(s), children, etc. and will take ke , ka, or na.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesWil267432

P.S. As for example: E na haumana, e lohe mai! Hey students, listen to me!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kupo_Tahlia-Kala

BECAUSE WE CAN ALRIGHT. ARE YOU HAWAIIAN? NO? THEN DON'T QUESTION OUR LANGUAGE! ...Please...

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdmcowan
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Whoa! Chill a little. Aloha kākou! They are not trying to accuse the language of doing something wrong. They are trying to understand how to predict when they will need to use "ke" in the future and when they won't. The way this course is taught it seems like this would be translated as "Hello, the child." But that clearly isn't right. In fact, the way this course teaches it, I would have thought it should be, "Aloha e keiki." So I think it's a good thing that this user decided to come here and ask for clarification and to correct that misunderstanding. I applaud them for asking this question.

1 week ago

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