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"¿Ustedes saben para quién trabajo?"

Translation:Do you know who I work for?

5 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ciakow

This is not English class... As a non native English speaker I was not expecting WHOM here... :-(

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adysah
adysah
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'for who I work' is also acceptable in English and 'whom' is not so often used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Although "for who I work" has become commonly spoken in English, it's still not considered correct in formal or academic grammar since the word after "for" (or any preposition) will always take the object form, which in this case is "whom."

(Rule of thumb for those who want to know when to use who/whom in English: whoM and hiM are both object pronouns that end with "M." If it makes sense to replace the mystery word with "him," use "whom"; if "he" sounds better, use "who." For example, we'd say "HE is the doctor," not "Him is the doctor," so write "WHO is the doctor?" We'd say "This belongs to HIM," not "This belongs to he," so write "WHOM does this belong to?")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllieLemke
EllieLemke
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Amen and Amen

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

azealia: I think most people would say: "...who I work for..." although that is not really proper English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aukejw
aukejw
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I agree on 'For who I work' being an acceptable solution, although I'm no native English speaker. Should this be corrected or not?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/a_kaiZer

No, because you don't work for "he/she", you work for "him/her" - so the question needs to be whom. Although, I did it wrong as well. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aukejw
aukejw
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Yeah, I found out afterwards as well :P but whom should at least be correct

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zvezdalion

After reporting that my translation should be accepted I started to get second thoughts... Is "Do you know who do I work for?" grammatically correct in English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sturdel

No, the second "do" is incorrect. "Do you know who I work for?" is the way I would ask this question. There is some discussion about the "correctness" of this but it is definitely the most common way to ask.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Villa_Crystal

no it is not

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rilianxi
rilianxi
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down with "whom". it's antiquated and unnecessary.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duudek

Sounds like a threat.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jude59

I don't understand where " I " comes into this sentence. "Do you know who...I...work for?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

The -o ending on "trabajo" means "I work." :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BackpackerGreg

In any language, I hope that improper grammar would be discouraged. (Pardon the passive voice.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rilianxi
rilianxi
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descriptivism ftw

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trifolium

Doesn't trabajo mean either "I work" or "I am working"? I got it wrong for translating it to "Do you know who I am working for?" (I know, I erroneously ended with a preposition, but that is not the part that got corrected.) :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BanjoNobody

Just for the record, it's perfectly correct to end a sentence with a preposition, so long as it's not awkward. It's widely thought to be a rule of grammer that's not used, but it's closer to an urban legent.

It's something up with which we should not put.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllieLemke
EllieLemke
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I agree that am working should be accepted as well

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

So is trabajo being used here as a verb, not a noun? Otherwise I can't see where the yo comes from.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Correct; "trabajo" is a verb here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Gracias, Athalia2

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kybobetancourt

Don Corleone

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manosdefie
manosdefie
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DICK JONES!!!

But srsly, depending on the context, this isn't really something you want to say to people because it sounds like name-dropping, which is frowned upon.

Also, I'm seeing a lot of discussion about "who" vs. "whom." Yes, "who" is subjective and "whom" is objective, but we would usually say "who I work for." If you want to be improper, "ya gotta do it right." ;p

Just to cover all possibilities: "whom I work for" - correct "for whom I work" - correct (but sounds very formal--too formal for most everyday situations) "who I work for" - not "technically" correct, but it's what most people actually say. "for who I work" - COMPLETELY WRONG! You don't want to combine too-formal word-order with incorrect grammar. You definitely don't sound like a native speaker.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandraLDieterich

I was having trouble figuring out where you got the I from. Thank you so much. These comments help me so much.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GerSzej
GerSzejPlus
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I wrote for whom I am working, and it was considered wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tecalai

That was a perfectly good translation, GerSzej. For some reason, Duo has limited the translation of the present tense verbs to the one form, in this case 'work.' However, the present tense really carries three possible translations: I work, I do work, I am working. In a question you would also find, Do I work? and Am I working? I think they are trying to draw a distinction between the simple present tense and the present progressive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllieLemke
EllieLemke
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It's actually: Do you (all) know for whom I work?"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan597269

Sounds like a line from The Godfather...

2 months ago