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"The chairs of the house"

Translation:Viti vya nyumbani

January 13, 2019

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NotaFakena1

Doesn't nyumbani mean "to the house"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedBossm

Nyumba means house. When you are saying 'at the house/in the house/of the house...etc' ,nyumba takes on the locative case which adds 'ni' to the end of it turning it into 'nyumbani'. Same thing for other places for example 'mkutano-meeting'. Ninaenda mkutanoni - im going to a meeting. See how it gained 'ni' at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spencervds

The use of the locative "ni" here is confusing to me. Would somebody please explain why it's needed for this phrase? Asante!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsimonds

"The chairs of the house" is grammatically correct English, but I suspect you will (almost) never hear an native speaker of English use the phrase. I googled it and the meaning that came back was "wenyekiti wa baraza la wawakilishi" -- totally different meaning from what is intended here. If I saw the phrase "viti vya nyumbani" standing alone I would probably translate it as "house chairs", like "viti vya darasani" (classroom chairs), "viti vya ofisini" (office chairs), maybe "viti vya shule[ni]" (school chairs).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naishorua1

I though nyumba was house and nyumbani home


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inyara4

This is exactly what i thought. Nyumba - house, nyumbani - home, to the house. Looks like it's not like that. So, when exactly is "nyumba" standing all by itself? Only in frases like "The house is big"?

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