https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto

Improve your Esperanto pronunciation

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I wrote this as a reply to a question in a sentence thread this morning. I thought other Esperanto learners might find it helpful. The question was on the pronunciation of oficejo.

Hopefully this playlist will help.

  • I have one video about the letter C (and the combination SC).
  • I have one video about combinations like EJ.
  • The third video is about I vs J.

If you work through those, then "o-fi-ce-jo" will be easy. (First video in Esperanto. The second video starts in Esperanto but is mostly in English.)

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLl5PRFz0DHxaeABFeoZ9GrVs8gRtr6DXR

4 weeks ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Enethir
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Thanks!

I'm sure you video about the pronunciation of "sc" (e.g. "scii", scenaro, ...) would be great here for people interested in pronunciation :-)

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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It's the first video in the series.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kdhy11
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PS: Ni havas la sonon "sc" en anglajn vortojn tiel "fists", "cysts", lists".

Por praktiki: oni diras "fists - ias". Iom post iom, oni mallongigas la spaco inter la du vortoj, ĝis ol oni havas unu (sensenacaĵan) vorton. Sed nur interesa estas la sono -- "fistsias".

La lasta paŝo estas: subtrahi la unuajn du letrojn: "fistias > istsias > stsias = scias"

La plimulto de sonoj el multaj lingvoj vere jam ekzistas en la angla -- sed ni devas kombini vortojn por trovi . . .

OK. I'm lost.. I tried my best to do this in Esperanto, so here's the English: Most of the sounds of other languages do exist in English: we just have to push the words together on paper, the same way we run them together when we speak.

The Esperanto "sc" for example, has an exact parallel in Russian, "сц" (eg. сцена", and can occur at the beginning, middle or end of a word. And we have it in English too.

We've already got the Esperanto "sc" in English words you commonly use, like "fists", "cysts", "lists" etc. The only problem in English is that this sound is rare at the beginning of a word ("tsetse" but no "stsetse"). So here's a way to "stage" yourself toward putting it at the beginning of a word.

Start with "Fists" and add the Eo "ias" (creating nonsense, but we're chasing the SOUND, not the sense). Play around with merging them into ONE word, starting with a small gap, then bringing them closer together until you have one nonsense glop that sounds like "Fistsias": "fists ---ias, fists--ias, fists-ias, fistias"

Now all you have to do is gradually remove the first two letters: start with "Fistsias > istsias > stsias = scias" and you're there!

Another technique that helps when you're tripping over your tongue is to simply SLOW DOWN. Every time you make a mistake that you want to correct in your pronunciation, repeat the utterance but SLOWER. And slower. And slower. Every time you make a mistake, slow down even MORE. Eventually, even if you sound like you are talking with glue in your mouth, you will get to a speed where you CAN manage all the minute changes of articulation and breathing to make the sound clearly.

In music (where I developed this technique) it would be going from the usual "presto" of conversation, to an allegretto, then a moderato, andante, lento and even lentissimo if you need to.

Once you find a speed that you can manage, get very comfortable with the utterance at that slooooow speed. Then just gradually build back up to a more usual rate of speech.

And hey, "presto" -- there you are.

Hope this is useful!

PS 2: for the "-gv-" just mush together English words like "sinGVocally" or "sinGVeryloud" or "diGVoles out of the ground", "biGVoltage", etc etc.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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PS: Ni havas la sonon "sc" en anglajn vortojn tiel "fists", "cysts", lists".

I disagree. We have the sound /sts/ in fists, cysts, and lists. It was for this very reason (that I find this kind of explanation unhelpful) that I made the video - and dedicated so much of it to the pronunciation of the Esperanto C.

There's a difference between /sts/ and /sc/.

PS 2: for the "-gv-" just mush together English words like "sinGVocally" or "sinGVeryloud" or "diGVoles out of the ground", "biGVoltage", etc etc.

Watch out for English words like "sing". In Esperanto the G is always pronounced as a hard G, even with an N in front of it.

Note that "singer" and "finger" do not rhyme. With "finger", you hear the G. That's how it is in Esperanto.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EPBmetal
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Saluton Salivanto. Lately I've encountered this word a lot in my reading practices: gvido. In my dictionary I found a few others with the same beginning: gvajako, gvaranio, gvardio (guard of a troop, different from gardisto) and gvati. And I'm quite sure there is a lesson in here where they talk about Gvatemalo. And I still don't know if there is a word in esperanto with the combination -gv- in the middle. I want to know if you know any reliable source where I can practice the pronunciation of these kind of words. I'm inclined to think the sound should be something like the spanish diphthong: gua for gva, güe for gve, güi for gvi and guo for gvo, BUT, if that's the case, why did they decide to use 'v' instead of 'ŭ'?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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And let's not forget Lingvo Internacia."

I'm only learning Spanish so I'm not sure how to advise you with regard to the Spanish words you listed.

"V" and "G" are pronounced the same regardless of where they are in a word - so the G will be hard and the V will have that vibration in it.

As for why - who can say? These decisions were made 130 years ago. It never seemed odd to me. To my ear it sounds like the kind of German accent I heard on Hogan's Heroes growing up.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EPBmetal
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Ho! Kiel mi povis forgesi la tre konatan vorton "lingvo"? I suppose it was because that particular word I pronounce it ling-vo and not lin-guo. In that case it's easy to separate the sound of both letters. But at the beginning it's hard for me not to make a 'kv' sound or only a 'v' sound.

My last question was not intended to analyse the historical reasons why those words are spelled like that, but to set out why I don't think pronouncing 'gvidi' as 'güi-di' is correct. I should have stated that more clearly.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joelfeila

so as an english speaker I found if I think of "c" asa high pressure s sound I can make it. So for "sc" I start with an s sound for a bit then start making high pressure. Scii gets really easy to pronounce after a little practice

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qubist
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Dankon!

4 weeks ago
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