https://www.duolingo.com/KingBearReynoso

Does the "er" or "or" in English equal "dor"

Player= jugador Fisher (fisherman)= pescador Creador= creat-er (creator) blanqueador= whiter aviador= aviator

January 17, 2019

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gene128
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it is common but not universal. Lots of cases of "ero", panadero (baker), ingeniero (engineer), etc. Also variations such as escritor (writer) and pintor (painter)

January 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharon275517

Also, not all combinations exist in English. For example, "blanqueador= whiter" -- "whiter" does not exist in English. We might say "whitener", or "bleacher".

January 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
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I'd count "whitener" as a match. It comes from the verb "whiten", just as "blanqueador" comes from the verb "blanquear".

January 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharon275517

Ah, thanks for the correction. I didn't know that Spanish verb.

January 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
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Not equal, but same origin. There are many exceptions in both directions. But yes, they are related and they usually can be directly translated. By the way, alternative forms in Spanish are -ero and -ario (some English words also have -ary, because they come from French words with the equivalent ending).

January 18, 2019
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