https://www.duolingo.com/MarkovV09

Tout craché

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I'm reading a comic book where one of the characters, Géo Trouvetou, says "Ça alors! Je n'y avais même pas pensé! Moi, j'aime juste inventer!", to which the other one, Picsou, replies: "C'est toi tout craché, ça! Un incurable rêveur!" and my feeling is that Picsou's line has a mistake in it, because "C'est toi tout craché, ça!" makes absolutely no sense to me.

1 month ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vulmugun
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Well there's no mistake, it's a different way of saying that someone is looking or acting exactly like another person or doing something in a his own way. For example, It's quite frequent to say to the father or the mother of a child something like " c'est ton portrait tout craché", it means that the child looks exactly like the parent. In the context of the book, Picsou wants to point out the fact that Geo trouvetou is faithful to himself ( his behavior is predictable, it's his trademark)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
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We have a similar expression in English as well. For example, we say that "you are the spit and image of your father" in the US. (the equivalent UK expression is "you are the dead spit of your father.")

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimDiggle
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Several years ago there was a very popular TV programme in the UK which took a satirical swipe at (mainly but not exclusively) politicians through the use of puppets with exaggerated features.

It was titled "Spitting Image" (many examples on You Tube) and was very popular. I remember reading a discussion in one of the respectable newspapers about the title. I seem to recall that the expression was deemed to have evolved from the Middle English "splitten" - past participle of the verb to split - suggesting an image split in 2, or 2 identical images.

Whether this explanation is true or not I have no idea but it certainly sounds plausible to me.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Svadilfary

Yes it's a french expression ^^ I like Scrooge too ^^ (I'm french and my English isn't very well)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatW.SelinaKyle

non, tu parle englas bon. Pardon my poor spelling and grammar. cool picture

1 month ago
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