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"Eu fui confundida com uma estudante."

Translation:I was mistaken for a student.

April 6, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koreatown

My answer ("I was confused with a student" - marked as correct) is very different from what Duolingo says ("I was mistaken for a student.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yep. Duolingo's sentence is closest to the meaning. But maybe someone has reported that and now they accept a more literal translation...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob3x

I wrote the literal translation too, and I thought that it was acceptable to use that expression in English to mean "I was mistaken for a student", but then I realized I only thought that because I know the Spanish version of the expression and it resembles the Portuguese version. After reading these comments, I searched for "I was confused with a student" in Google - there were only two results, and this comment page was one of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pandrewhk

If you google just "confused with". you'll see it's a synonym for "mistaken for".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulBelme

Yeah I think it's reasonable English, more context is better but it works


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DMF86

another instance of two distinct meanings being taken for one and the proper hints not being given.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Can you give us examples of those different meanings?

I couldn't find much about "confused with", but Longman says it means pretty much the same as "mistaken for".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKey718

Both, "I was confused with a student." and "I was mistaken for a student." mean the same thing in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

I agree. "To confuse someone with someone else" is "to mistake someone for/with someone else" as defined in this link: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/confuse+with


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floklo

I disagree. I admit I'm from western Canada though I think what I speak is similar enough to American English. I would interpret "confused with a student" to be "confused [about something] just like another student". However, I would say "confused as a student" could have the same meaning as "mistaken for a student" if there is proper context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birdmanbill

Point taken but if someone in the UK was to say I was angry with my sister there would usually be only one connotation....ie that you were mad with something she had said or done!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoorque

"Eu fui confundido com um estudante." - not accepted?! why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

It's also right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam533592

Please clear this up for me once and for all: is the word "estudante" a male word or a female word. Duolingo has had both as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes, it is both male and female and is guided by the word used before: o estudante / a estudante.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam533592

Hm. Didn't realize there are unisex words in Portuguese. OK. Thanx Paulenrique.

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