1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Aus einem Laden"

"Aus einem Laden"

Translation:Out of a store

April 6, 2013

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlonZ

Why does 'aus' means here 'out of'? It seems this word has many different usages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lenkvist

It is used to say that something is "from" a store as it comes "out of" it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8KAITO8

Then why "From the store" is marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8KAITO8

Nevrmind, it should be from "a store", not "the store", but I can't delete my comment on the Duo app :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adikkkkj

Whats the difference between laden and geschäft?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apahegy

From what I understand, "Laden" means "shop/store," like a place an ordinary citizen goes to buy things like groceries, whereas "Geschäft means "business." Geschäft is not a concrete object, like a store is, since a business isn't.

Does anyone else care to confirm or deny this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SquareFrame

I've mentioned in a different post that I always hear my in-laws referring to Geschäft in the same way as I would use the word "shop". I could be misinterpreting them though.

I've also heard them use the word Laden used in the context of storage area - for example, the small storage room beside a kitchen where one might keep sundries, floor brush, cleaners, etc..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Could they maybe be using the English "larder" for the storage room (pantry)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Kierz_

why dem laden? Dem = dative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelBoas

Yes, because there is also the word " out of". It makes it Dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GauravAhuj6

Whats the difference between laden and geschäft?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyLegendaryBeing

I'm kind of confused. I listened to a German song, and one of the lines is "Laden euch mit ein", and the definition of it for "store" wouldn't fit. Any ideas on what this could be? Google Translate says it could be "invite you to a" but I doubt the "invite" part.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

"einladen" means "to invite"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyLegendaryBeing

So the words in the lyrics were just in the wrong order, or is this another moderately confusing German context thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

"Einladen" is a separable verb - like "ansehen" ("look at") or "zuhören" ("listen to").

That said, "Laden euch mit ein" doesn't seem to be grammatically correct; it might be colloquial, or might be leaving some words out.

What's the song?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyLegendaryBeing

Haha, the German Little Einsteins theme song. A few noticeable other ones were in there to, like "geh'n" instead of "gehen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowschank

Aus einem Laden kommt die Bombe...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatCarroll1

Is that preferable to von Laden


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chucklenuts7

❤❤❤❤❤❤ dude- you've given me the perfect opportunity. I'm sorry, but-

Osama von Laden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PraneethJayanthi

It can also be from a store


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.b.e.e.

why einem though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

The preposition aus takes a Dativ object. In this case, Laden, which is masculine. The base indefinite article ein needs to be declined for the Dativ, thus einem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

In the U.S. we might call something ¨store bought¨ (as an adjective). Do Germans have similar, or would they merely use ¨aus dem Laden¨?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

As I search through examples of German-English translations, I am seeing a lot of this phrase " im Geschäft gekauftem" being used as an adjective and being translated to "store-bought" . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meena520841

Does "Aus einem laden" also means "From a shop"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

I think that checks out - "aus" is a preposition that requires Dative and "Laden" is a neuter, and "einem'' is the correct article for a neuter noun in Dative case . . . but I'm not a native speaker and am relatively new to this, so . . . does anyone more experienced need to correct me here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ForesterD

'Store' is more American than British English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaLawho

Could this also mean From a store?

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.