"Kunden ville snakke med sjefen min, men det er jo meg."

Translation:The customer wanted to speak with my boss, but that is me.

3 weeks ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Zoidy287

What does 'jo' add to this sentence? It would make sense to me without it and I would not have thought to add it if going from English to Norwegian.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windrammer
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"Jo" is difficult to explain in a language that lacks it. It's a confirmation of the information or the content in a sentence. You could see it as a similarity to "in fact".

... , but that is (in fact) me.

https://no.wiktionary.org/wiki/jo

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/weerwater
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When translating from English I agree. I would not see any way to include the word 'jo' into English either. From Dutch there would be a similar addition: 'dus'. to the sentence. So that would facilitate a more 'parallel translation' .

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stig949337
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It makes perfectly sense without. I usually see "jo" as an argumentative confirmation, someting English lacks. In this sentence, it would best be translated as a "right?", "in fact" or "isn't it?" at the end. Other uses of you: "Du kan ikke svømme!" - "Jo, jeg kan det". Here, I would use "jo" because I am arguing, negating the other statement, but still agreeing with the underlying clause: I can, in fact, swim.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skidbladner
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"that is me" - 'det er jo meg'

I know that English ordinarily uses object pronouns for subject complement.
Is this also the case in Norwegian?
(In Swedish it's not.)

3 weeks ago
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