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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EleonoraGr243915

What is the difference between 'я вышла' and 'я выходила'.

Both are in the past, meaning 'I went out'. But can you explain with examples, please, what is the exact difference between them?

Thanks in advance!!

January 21, 2019

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shyl1ght

The difference is something common to Russian verbs. First one is a perfective, second is imperfective. Perfective verbs are used for actions that are finished, imperfective are for the ones that are incomplete or indefinitely repeated. Here's a couple examples

"Я вышла из автобуса и увидела тебя" — "I came out of a bus and saw you".

"Я выходила из автобуса, когда увидела тебя" — "I was coming out of a bus when I saw you"

As you can see, in the first one both actions are complete, so both verbs use a perfective form ("вышла", "увидела"). In the second one, however, the act of coming out of a bus isn't complete at the point of time the sentence refers to, however the act of seeing someone is, so we get both imperfective and perfective forms ("выходила", but "увидела").

Hopefully that was helpful, but I'd recommend reading up on Verb Aspects anyway. I'll just link related wikibooks pages, but there's a lot of resources out there that explain them so feel free to look them up. https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Russian/Verbal_Aspect https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Russian/Grammar/Past_tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Pozin2

Где мама? Она вышла в магазин. Сейчас вернётся.
( Now she isn’t at home) Мама, где ты была утром? Я выходила в магазин. (She is home now) Она вышла замуж за Ивана. She married Ivan. Она до этого выходила замуж много раз. Before she got married many times. Actually, these two verbs have a lot of meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirokha

Я вышла = I came out / I have come out
Я выходила = I was coming out / I have been coming out

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