https://www.duolingo.com/RobbieJanz

How Long to Learn Norwegian?

I'm a native English speaker who is trying to learn Norwegian. How long should it to take to at the very least become good at it? The timeframe isn't very important to me,but I'm curious how long I should expect it to take. I'm try to do an hour a day (I can't practice more, as I'm in high school and don't have much free time).

3 weeks ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Whizbang
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The US Foreign Service Institute, which trains diplomats, categorizes Norwegian as a category 1 language, which means it is among the easiest languages for native English speakers to learn at a professional level (which is still far less than a native level)

"Easiest" may make you think that learning it will be easy, but learning any language requires time and patience and is not necessarily easy.

The FSI says that category 1 languages require about 600-750 hours (on average) of language study in a formal classroom setting to acquire. At one hour per day, you are looking at about two years.

In practice, I think the FSI's numbers are pretty aggressive but, at about 1 1/2 years in, I am beginning to feel some confidence with the language. I will probably not have met the FSI's proficiency level by the 750 hour mark, though.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pioenrosa
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it depends on how often you study and whether your study methods are beneficial to you. everyone is different! norwegian is allegedly one of the easiest languages for native english speakers to learn, but - while it is similar - there are still a number of concepts that are somewhat foreign (prepositions, dialects, and multiple ways to say things that we only have one word for in english, for example).

if you practice consistently i'm super sure you'll become proficient at norwegian in no time! it really is an easy and enjoyable learning language! i've been at it for nearly two years and still absolutely love it. norwegian has inspired not only a brand new appreciation for education and learning, but the motivation to continue with my studies by adopting yet another language: french! i hope you fall in love with norwegian, too!

lykke til, vennen!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshsi1998

I have been learning Norwegian for some time and I find that the slower I take it the better I learn, I estimate it to take me a year. I started last November.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mannutenland

It depends on what you mean 'good' at it as well as what your sources will be, as well as your innate knack for languages.

Let's assume you spend an hour a day of focused study.
If all of that is on Duolingo - after a year you're probably going to have a very solid foundational vocabulary as well as solid reading skills - but I'd predict that you'd struggle a little with writing, speaking, and listening(to actual in-the-wild norwegian).
If you spent an hour a day doing nothing but watching Norwegian TV or listening to Norwegian radio with focus, I'd expect that you might have reasonably strong speaking and listening, but relatively weak reading and writing.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angellore-Raven
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Theoretically you need 3000 words to understand 80% of a language and reach a lower B2 level. So if you learn 10 new words per day you can achieve this goal in one year. However I would more say 2 years for a B2 level with serious work.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fitt3
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Learning Norwegian for 4 years now. Still bad at it. But maybe Im slow if you know what I mean.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adrian442793

It's often said that it takes 10,000 words to become fluent in a language, because that's the average active vocabulary size of a native speaker. (And maybe the average university-educated person has an active vocab of more like 15,000-20,000; and the passive vocabulary of any native speaker is a lot more again.)

So if you're learning five new words a day, that's 2,000 days, or 5.4 years. If you're learning 10 new words a day, it's still 2.7 years. So, just to get on top of basic vocab, you're looking at 3-6 years.

Add a year to practice reading/listening skills, and I think that means, for any language, it'll take the average person around four years to reach basic fluency, depending how you define fluency.

But there's a lot of variables.... I studied Latin for ten years, but ancient languages are often taught to be analysed, not to be spoken. My reading fluency in it is very bad, and my speaking fluency non-existent.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angellore-Raven
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With 10 000 words, you are not fluent but almost bilingual. Most people know about 15 000 words of their language, and the most educated people 30 000. Fluently start at 3 000- 3 500 words, when you understand 80% of what it is said. We use only 5 000 words on our daily life.

6 days ago
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