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  5. "That tall Klingon is beautif…

"That tall Klingon is beautiful."

Translation:'IH tlhInganvetlh woch.

January 26, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeifaeklubs

can someone tell me if there's a difference between "tIn" and "woch"? Can they be used interchangeably?

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

It is the exact same as the difference between "big" and "tall" in English. Something can be big in ways that aren't necessarily tall. And if something is tall, but narrow, you might not necessarily call it "big", although sometimes the tallness is sufficient to still call it "big". There are lots of situations where either or both words are appropriate, but they still have slightly different meanings and are not really interchangable. tIn means "big" and woch means "tall".

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeifaeklubs

Thanks, that makes more sense than what my brain came up with :)

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkLucy77

I'm getting the hang of the prefixes and suffixes but struggling to work out which order words should come in. Do you have any tips for working out the correct word order?

January 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

Basic sentence order is OBJECT-VERB-SUBJECT.

When a "be" verb (like woch be tall) modifies a noun like an adjective, it comes after the noun.

Any nouns, noun phrases, or adverbials that aren't subject or object come before the whole OVS structure, with a few exceptions. Nouns or noun phrases like this usually are either time expressions at the very front or are marked with a syntactic suffix.

Any dependent verbal clauses that aren't relative clauses (which are noun phrases) come either before or after the main sentence. Purpose clauses (those with -meH) must come before, but the others can come before or after.

January 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkLucy77

Thanks. I'm going to have to brush up on my grammar vocabulary to make better sense of it I think! I shall definitely refer back to this post to help out! choBoQ je jiHghoj! Bivu.

January 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

I think you meant choboQpu' 'ej jIghojpu' You helped me and I have learned. Not sure what the "Bivu" is supposed to be.

I'd try to make it clearer, but all the various pieces each require their own explanations, so it would become unwieldy.

If you haven't already, get yourself a copy of The Klingon Dictionary, which explains most of the grammar of the language in easy-to-understand terms.

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkLucy77

Yes, that's what I was trying to say. :) Why do they both need pu' on the end? (I only know pu' as a suffix to make nouns plural at the moment) Sorry about the last bit - I wrote a word down wrong in my notes! I meant Bival! I've ordered The Klingon Dictionary which will be more reliable than my chaotic notebook! Thanks.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

There are separate -pu' suffixes, one for nouns and one for verbs, and they have completely different meanings. The verb suffix -pu' means that the action of the verb is complete. So if you meant, "You have helped me and I have learned," then you should put the -pu' on there. Though if you meant it more like a repetitive thing then it is OK without them: "Over and over, you help me and I learn."

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkLucy77

Thanks. I don't think I've got to that bit yet so my attempt was a bit simplified. :) I appreciate all the help both past and on going!

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

Even if it's over and over, it still needs a -pu' if the help is complete. choboQpu' You helped me, and now that help is over.

On the other hand, if you're describing a particular condition that was operative in the past, you don't need it: choboQ It was the state of affairs that you would help me.

January 29, 2019
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