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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timshelburne

"Caster sugar"

April 6, 2013

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Well it's sugar, simply it's not presented in cubes but in powder.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timshelburne

is it a french thing? never heard of this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/limegimlet

If France, when one talks about "sucre", they are referring to cubes (or now tubes), for drinking with coffee. It seems any other type of sugar (to use with baking etc..) needs more description. It's the opposite of the US


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

French ? I don't think it's specific to France because I've seen it in other countries. But I could not say if its origins are from France though. But don't worry we also have sugar cubes in France, you won't be lost ^^.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

Not as fine as powder, the consistency is more like fine salt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Well, that's what we call powder sugar in France (sucre en poudre).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hunterwolf

Is this powdered sugar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lpacker

According to Wikipedia, caster (or castor) sugar is so named because the grains are small enough to fit through a sieve (or castor). It is the equivalent of superfine sugar in the U.S.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cunningjames

I reported this as unnatural. I've never encountered such a phrase. If we had to make the distinction, we'd say "table sugar" or more commonly "granulated sugar".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

James, I have just reported it as unnatural/an error. I believe it should be "sucre fine". "Sucre de poudre" implies powdered sugar. I have lived in many countries and use the stuff a lot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

If you're talking about the French part, you're wrong. The two possible translations for "caster sugar" are either "sucre en poudre" (not "de poudre"), or either "sucre semoule".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

Thanks- then I prefer "sucre semoule" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timberhawk

I think this ("caster sugar") is a rare case where a British term is being favoured.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

I agree. I live in Austria, where we have fine or course sugar and powdered sugar etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caper
  • 2418

Here in Canada there is no such thing as "caster sugar." We have "icing sugar", table sugar, brown sugar, many kinds, but there is no such thing as "caster sugar."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

We do have something called 'berry sugar' (I have a bag of it in my baking drawer) which is finer than regular granulated sugar, but not as fine as powdered (or icing) sugar. Maybe caster sugar is similar to that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jkitts

I have a Victorian sugar castor, also called a muffineer. It is like a salt shaker on steroids. It is what one used in the past to sprinkle sugar on food. And the sugar that is used in such a utensil is "caster sugar". I, however, use mine to sprinkle cinnamon on my oatmeal in the morning. A lot of those for sale on ebay are british or american.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cunningjames

I'm unsure where you're from, but in the US such contraptions are still pretty common; we have one we use every day. But I've never heard anyone call it a castor, nor call the sugar inside castor sugar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jkitts

Oregon. It probably depends on your background how common they are. Mine is the first in the family. Check ebay. They list them as sugar shakers, muffineers and sugar castors. And my local grocery sells packages of sugar labeled "castor sugar". It is a great store and has about 5 different types of sugar. Of course, this is Portland where ingredients are almost a religion.

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