"Es un lugar del que no puedes regresar."

Translation:It is a place from which you cannot return.

5 years ago

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/virharding

Hell? The Hotel California?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TezraM

Pero usted nunca puede irse.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MannyOD
MannyOD
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Why "del" and not simply "de"? If it is a house from which you can't return, would the sentence be, "Es una casa de la que no puedes regresar." ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I have the same question. Why del ? Is del also de+lo in addition to de+el ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

I thought of this as "of-it-that" literally & came up with "of which" as an English equivalent.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

yeah, the whole que vs. de que thing ... that's a struggle ...

but ... it's specifically the del that throws me because (usually) de + el = del, but here I would think it would be lo and not el and I didn't think de + lo = del ...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I think it is de + el. "Lo que" is used for abstract ideas, whereas "el/la/los/las que" are used for tangible nouns: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/relproelque.htm So this sentence uses "de el que" contracted to "del que" as it refers to a physical place. I guess if the place in question were hell, as the first comment offered, then the sentence could then use "de lo que" as it would be referring to an abstract concept instead of a physical place (religious beliefs allowing).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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"It's a place from where you can't return" disallowed too!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneZahra

"It is a point of no return" is the best idiomatic translation for this sentence, but will be marked wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Did you try it? If so, and if it marked you wrong, did you report it?

Edit: I did a practice on "regresar" and got this sentence. It doesn't accept it, so I reported it. Hopefully enough people will report it and it will be eventually accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Why no SE before puedes. If the sentence is reformatted as "You cant return from that place" than the implied subject is YOU(Tu)? You cant return (yourself) from that place. Isnt the verb acting FOR and UPON the subject(tu)? Im not sure if Im making sense. Im just putting my understanding of the above sentence out there. Thanks for any input.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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All I can say is that you shouldn't use the reflexive because it's not really needed or implied in the sentence from what I see. "You can't return..."="no puedes regresar...". You could write "no se puede regresar..." using the impersonal "se" to mean "one/you cannot return...", but "poder" is not typically used as a reflexive verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TalGelman-

In Spanish(at least according to what I know) different verbs work differently. There are verbs that doesn't require the object pronoun(like regresar) and verbs that do(like detener. E.g:I stopped - me detuve ). hope this helps :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Interesting sentence & clever use of 'del'. Normally we think of 'lo que' as 'what' (non-interrogative) but here it is 'which' but still needs 'lo'. It's a conjunctive phrase (del que) found in my dictionary and I also saw that it could be "a la que" so I am assuming that since we are talking 'lugar' which is masculine it's why we use the "del que". Cool.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
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Wouldn't "whence" or "from whence" make more sense in all but the most casual speech? I'm reporting it. 5/14/14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hello_world_hola

Within the US, whence makes more sense only in the least casual of speech.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
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True enough. I worded that badly. I meant that many English speakers would use "whence" in any context in which speaking "correctly" is important. For example, when one is trying to make a good impression on a boss, teacher, client, etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam113329

Any reason that "It is a place from whence you cannot return" shouldn't be accepted?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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This one got me thinking. Firstly, "whence" is archaic so unless you're Gandalf or Elrond it will probably sound a bit odd. This isn't a reason to say your usage is incorrect, but it could explain why DL doesn't accept it.

On a technical level "from whence" is actually incorrect usage because "whence" requires no preposition, but when "whence" is used these days most people would include the preposition "from", so again this isn't a reason your sentence is incorrect.

If there is a reason it may be due to specific meaning. "Whence" means "from where" or "from which", but crucially it holds a sense of origin. While "from where" or "from which" can easily be substituted into your sentence, I'm not sure that sense of origin necessarily can.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrcmnstr
mrcmnstr
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Excellent response!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliT.Firef
AliT.Firef
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Dejan toda esperanza ustedes que entran. Is that right?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrcmnstr
mrcmnstr
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I think it's "la esperanza" because you're talking about the concept of hope in general. Also, nice Dante reference! https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/using-the-definite-article-in-spanish

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

Why "del que" and not "de que"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I have been wondering the same thing. Here's something that discusses "de que" vs "del que". http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2511201

One quote from the discussion: 'in spanish we not use " de que" just use "del que" means "the theme of which we spoke" the other it's just a bad expression to speak in spanish!! '

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/masonIFTW

Missing alternative translations..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Sounds like logar to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bbaggins8286
Bbaggins8286
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Crossing the river Styx tends to be permanent

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcomero
Marcomero
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¿La muerte?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfwixted

I put "It is a place that you cannot return to" I'm not clear where I went wrong ... anyone help? Cheers!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/virharding

Del is a contraction for de (from) and el so it's return from, not return to.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfwixted

ok thank you - that helps :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psieger
psieger
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DON'T TAKE THE MICKEY OUT OF ME! 'from which' was marked wrong, 'from where' as correct answer. I retake the lesson and then 'from where' is wrong, and 'which' right. Is this a joke?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisaandtim
lisaandtim
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Del supposedly means "from" but I CAN'T TELL A DIFFERENCE IN MEANING in this sentence. 'It's a place you can't go back to." OR "It's a place you can't go back from."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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The core of the sentence is pretty straightforward, but it gets lost in a more complex structure. If you temporarily alter the subject it may help:

No puedes regresar de ese lugar - You cannot return from that place.

The DL sentence has the place as the subject instead of you, and it uses a couple of pronouns to do this: The subject pronoun "es", and the tricky little relative pronoun "el que".

Es un lugar del que no puedes regresar - It is a place from which you cannot return.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterWells3

'It is a place from which you are not able to return' got rejected. Why?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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DL has always preferred "can" for "poder" instead of "be able to". There's nothing wrong with your translation though.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkHender5

What makes it "return from" and not "return to"? Thanks, Mark

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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The preposition "de" in the "del que" construction. I'm guessing you could substitute if for "a" to get the other meaning, but I can't guarantee it: Es un lugar al que no puedes regresar.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkHender5

Should my comments be seen by me immediately, or is there a delay? Seems like mine never show up. Thanks, Mark

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkHender5

Why isn't "It is a place of no return" accepted? I think that is an acceptable English phrase.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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It conveys the meaning OK, but the common English phrase is "point of no return". DL tends to avoid confusing things ... mostly.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlotte818236

You can check in but you can't check out??

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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It is a place where you cannot return from. Just bad English?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

"It is a place from which you cannot return". That sounds short, clear and correct to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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That's the "official" translation shown at the top of the page.

That is the manner in which I would write it if I were writing very formal prose (heh :-). But it's not how I would write it normally, and it's especially not how I would say it. I would say "It's a place you can't return from." Maybe with a "that" before the "you".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Hmm? I'd swear it wasn't that when I first looked. Nice to now see such a good sentence :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

I probably would say it the way that you said you would say it.Nevertheless I prefer the more formal translation. The rule that says one should not end a sentence with a preposition is a rule that today is only observed in the breach.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/revdolphin
revdolphin
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It's not an English language rule. It was a rule invented by grammar school teachers who were used to teaching Latin.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Or maybe "...in the breach thereof" :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

"It is a place you cannot return from." When told that putting a preposition at the end of a sentence was poor grammar, Winston Churchill is reported to have said, "That is an idea we should not up with put." I will go with Mr. Churchill's opinion on this one.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnRon

I believe the quote is "This is the kind of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karimagon

Kind of. The preposition at the end of the sentence is Very Bad according to some. :)

If you write it that way (which is allowed in less formal contexts), you can omit the "where"; it's not necessary.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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thanks

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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I don't know the grammatical reason to tell you, but "where" in that sentence sounds wrong. It should be "which", or "that", or absent altogether.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I don't think it's bad English. It liked "It is a place that you can't return from". The only real difference from yours is "where" vs "that", and I think both are ok, and I think "where" is probably better.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glory_days
glory_days
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I am a native english speaker and I am confused as to what the english translation means.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It means you can go to that place, but you can't return from there.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatPurusha

But that makes no sense—what does it mean in reality................

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrcmnstr
mrcmnstr
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I think this is the darkest sentence I've ever seen on duolingo

4 years ago
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