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"Mi maleta es amarilla."

Translation:My suitcase is yellow.

5 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/e.bella_
e.bella_
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At least it'll be easy to spot on the luggage carousel

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Yep! I have a yellow one for that very reason.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinkfroggirl

you made my day!!!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0christ.e

EXACTLY! THIS MAKES PERFECT SENSE! WHY DON'T THEY MAKE MORE YELLOW SUITCASES? LINGOTS FOR EVERYONE!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeTorngren

If everyone had a yellow suitcase then it wouldn't stand out

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alice51k

I got no lingots :-(

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Here, have a couple of mine. :-)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KaylieSlin1

How does this have to do with sanish ?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IvyMike

Does anyone know the etymology of "maleta"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IgnasiJM

It seems it comes from the french word "malle", which originally referred to a bag used to carry mail. http://etimologias.dechile.net/?maleta

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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In French we say : " malette"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Malette is a diminutive of malle (which is a big trunk rather than a portable suitcase).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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In France, when they say "Malette", they mean it as "suitcase", and sometimes like "diplomatic bag" without specifying, "mallette/valise diplomatique".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Yes, I was just clarifying the connection to 'malle' mentioned above. 'Malle' (trunk) became 'mala' in Spanish, and in both languages the word for suitcase arose as a diminutive of these ('malette' or 'maleta').

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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Yes, exactly.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elysdir

Thanks! I was wondering this too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paoloandy

It's mallette lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

Hey that was close. I just discovered another 'false friend' : Maleta = bag, suitcase; Mallet (used for hitting things = Mazo + descriptor. Guess my construction Spanish isn't so hot after all ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicklegs
nicklegs
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So my dear Spaniards, If I said Maleta in Spain, would people generally refer to that more as luggage for travel or also for a backpack or even a shopping bag? Thanks in advance ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dadatic
dadaticPlus
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Only luggage for travel.

A backpack would be "una mochila".

A shopping bag would be "una bolsa de la compra", usually just "una bolsa" if the context is clear.

Additionally, a briefcase can be called "un maletín" or "una cartera"; without context, cartera is ambiguous, because it can also refer to a wallet.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brennaboo

I guess briefcase is not the same as suitcase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paoloandy

Mallette is the French word for suitcase, just dropped the "e" and replace it with "a" since I speak French that was an easy one for me. Spanish should be easy for anyone who speaks French.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sevy694
sevy694
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Romance languages are great! I've studied French and Portuguese, so I'm enjoying all the cognates. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-XSebaStiaNx-

It seems it comes from the french word "malle", which originally referred to a bag used to carry mail. http://etimologias.dechile.net/?maleta

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Panamapal

If you click on "maleta" in the sentence, DL shows it to mean suitcase, bag, case, but yet they marked me wrong when I used case.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wave89
wave89
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why luggage is spotted as wrong answer??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chucki79

Luggage is plural, isn't it? Maleta or valija is singular therefore I expected Baggage as a solution. Sadly it is not accepted here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

To me baggage is also plural. I guess we have to think of it more like clothes and fish. They can be used either way. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Baggage and luggage are both mass nouns (or uncountable nouns, which is odd if you think about it, since they refer to things that are obviously discrete and countable), so they're always grammatically singular, even when you're talking about multiple items.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kurt218439

I believe that while that is true for American English, but goes the other way for British speakers

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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I'm not sure what you mean by "goes the other way". I'm a New Zealander, so my English is more British than American, and I've lived in the UK.

I don't think I've ever heard anyone use either baggage or luggage as a count noun. I would never refer to, say, "ten baggages/luggages" - I'd always use the singular to refer to a collection of any number of individual items.

Is that not standard usage in both British and American English?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Right, I think I've figured out the source of confusion.

Collective nouns (like band or government) are indeed treated differently in British and American Englishes, and there's a good explanation on Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collective_noun#Metonymic_merging_of_grammatical_number

But luggage is (I think) a mass noun, and those are always grammatically singular.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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When you say "every piece of baggage...", the noun is "piece", which is definitely countable and singular, so I don't think it would ever be acceptable to use "are" in that case.

The question is whether you could ever say "the baggage are...", and I'm not entirely sure of the answer, or whether there's a US/UK difference. To me, "the baggage is..." seems more natural in every case I can think of.

Your example with the band is a bit different, in that it's a group of people, and they could each individually begin to play, so the singular and the plural can both work. It's a bit hard to think of a case where each piece of baggage acts individually.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandasMom

I used to watch Craig Ferguson on American television and now I watch Doctor Who on BBC America. On those shows they say things like "CBS are," "the government are," "UNIT are," etc. It used to really grate on my nerves because in America we would use "is" as the verb in each of those instances. Now that I have seen so much and understand they are using proper UK English, I've gotten over it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kurt218439

An American would say "The band begins to play," but I have read British literature that says "The band begin to play."

I know that an American would say "Every piece of baggage is . . . " I suspect that it was once grammatically acceptable for a British speaker to say "Every piece of baggage are . . ."

The difference is in whether baggage and the verb that agrees with it are considered singular. It is possible that my understanding is outdated or entirely mistaken.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kurt218439

I am quite confident that "the band begin to play" is not acceptable in American English.

Perhaps the example I gave could have been better - but I was trying to get across the idea that a singular noun used to describe a group of things (like "band," and maybe baggage) is always considered singular in American English, but occasionally plural in British English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dade_Pritchett

How is 'my yellow suitcase' wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

You left out the verb. This is a declaration of the color in a complete sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dade_Pritchett

I thought it was right because I was still describing the suitcase. Guess I was wrong, thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paoloandy

You have to use the verb... My suitcase is yellow

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mega_Bobby

Why is "my case is yellow" wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

Hi Mega_Bobby Have a read of the comments above where there's a bit of discussion re case/suitcase. I wrote as you did and when it was marked wrong, I reported it saying my answer should be accepted. So 'my case is yellow' is not wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jleiney

mi maleta estan blanco originalmente

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

and i'm so proud of this fact!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/herbert1985
herbert1985
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Maldito seja Carlos Amarilla!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalebHicke1

:-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalebHicke1

I love duo lingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pemily222

Do adjectives change gender based on the subject?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaJa11190

Hickory dickory dock the mouse ran up the clock

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaJa11190

The clock struck 1:00, hickory dickory dock

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaJa11190

Hi

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James613300
James613300
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It accepts bag but NOT handbag.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Quite right. You wouldn't carry your clothes in a handbag when you travel, would you?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob88774

That is what i said

7 months ago