https://www.duolingo.com/Redrum.Cinemas

Learn Chinese to improve Kanji

Another question, but if i learned Chinese would it help or confuse my progress in learning Kanji even more. I am learning Japanese and i find it difficult to learn Kanji quickly. ありがとう

2 weeks ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
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Yes and no. Starting with the negative answer, Chinese characters (both simplified as Duolingo teaches and traditional as used in Taiwan) are different from Kanji (which is simplified from the traditional Chinese in different ways from Chinese simplified hanzi). You will simply add more work if you learn Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji side by side with only the intention to learn the Kanji.

On the other hand, if you want to learn Mandarin Chinese anyway, you will find a lot of overlap with Chinese pronunciation and Japanese onyomi readings, which will help with Japanese onyomi in compound words. (not the kunyomi stand-alone readings though). And even though the characters are different, you might recognize plenty of characters that are similar and many that are the same.

If you want to learn Japanese, stick to Japanese and put more time into Kanji. If you want to learn both Chinese and Japanese, take both and realize it'll be harder if you already struggle learning Kanji. Chinese grammar is slightly easier than Japanese grammar imo, though.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Redrum.Cinemas

Thank you for the time to make this, and i see your meaning. thank you very much for explaining!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DestinyCall

If you already know Chinese, it would save you some time because there is some overlap, especially with onyomi readings. But if you do NOT know Chinese, it will add to your workload significantly. You won't save any time, because you'll have even more to learn to understand Chiense. Kanji is quite different from modern Mandarin. The readings and meanings are different. The vocabulary is not the same. Neither is the grammar. It is a different language.

Don't learn Chinese to help with learning Japanese. Learn Chinese because you want to learn Chinese.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Redrum.Cinemas

Ahh thank you and will take your comment into consideration.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AStrangeChiald

just get all the hiragana stuff to 5, it helps a lot. I need to practice it all again tho sksksk

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Hopi_

hello, your profile told me to say hi, so I am saying hi :)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLord2k1
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The effort you'll do in learning chinese kanji
put it in learning the japanese one

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/White-Camillia

I would say yes. Chinese is my native language, if you know how to read Chinese, it's easier to read Japanese. Chinese and Japanese also have some pronoucition similarities, if you know what I meant. Likewise, if you know Japanese, it will be easier to learn Chinese.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betarage
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Yes but unless you want to learn both Chinese and Japanese like me its not worth it if you only care about Japanese

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hiba-al-Sayf
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Both.

How it makes things easy: (1) A lot of the Kanji & Hanzi (two names for the same) are identical. (2) Chinese uses only the Hanzi so you can learn a lot more of them even in the rudimentary lessons.

How it does not make things easy: (1) Pronunciation: The Hanzi may be pronounced differently, and (with the standardization of Mandarin) sometimes very differently than the equivalent Kanji. Why this can get problematic is very obvious. As a comparable example from a friend's experience: ض is pronounced somewhat like 'd' in standard Arabic but somewhat like 'z' in Persian. His Arabic pronunciation gets in the way of his Persian pronunciation, especially since Persian has a lot of Arabic loanwords. (2) An evolutionary tale: Both the Kanji and the Hanzi have gone through different simplifications and created different forms derived from the same (Traditional Chinese) character. Though the principles of simplification have been nearly identical (reducing the number of strokes and complexity), that's too subjective, and you cannot do it in one way for any given character.

If I were you (assuming you have no goal of learning Chinese per se), I'd stick to Duolingo's pacing for introducing the Kanji because it reflects their frequency in Japanese writing. For extra reference, a useful book is 'Remembering the Kanji' which introduces mnemonics and meanings for Kanji (bt not the pronunciations; use a resource enumerated here for that - https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/look-up-kanji/ )

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DestinyCall

In my opinion, DuoLingo introduces kanji way too slow. You would better off studying kanji in greater depth outside of DuoLingo, if you want to progress deeper into the language. Otherwise, your lack of kanji knowledge will start to hold you back.

Also, hanzi and kanji are not just two names for the same thing. That's like saying beagles and poodles are two names for the same thing. They are both dogs, but they have evolved along very different routes. They are related, but not identical. Same thing with hanzi and kanji.

The similarities can be helpful, if you have a strong foundation in one of the languages, but those same similarities can get you in trouble, if you are new to both languages. Because it can lead you to making false assumptions and confusing similar but different words.

2 weeks ago
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