https://www.duolingo.com/Jay2Cruz

Seriously Learning Japanese - Routines and Resources

Hi people of Duolingo!

I wanted to make a post about asking what you guys use to seriously learn Japanese and what resources / routines you guys use to learn the awesome language.

And what you used from the each levels you have conquered Japanese (resources that you used when you were beginner, intermediate and advanced.)

Thanks so much for your replies!

2 weeks ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/N.u.N
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Well, I am kind of a fanatic, so I went overboard. anime, subbed+raw, manga translated+ not, multi-lingual dictionary, japanese for dummies, music, youtube, japanesethroughanime.com.

anything i could get my hands on, because i didn't have many opportunities. but i truly love japan and its culture, so its worth it.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/N.u.N
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  • I'm gonna' try Genki, and I made my own hiragana flash cards out of my brothers old note-cards. ( I'm 16, and don't have much money, or a drivers license, just found duolingo last year, and it's just dandy!
2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay2Cruz

Fantastic! Sounds like a great free way haha. I also bought Genki 1 and it is arriving tomorrow! So I'm excited. I will also watch lots of anime and learn haha.

Also good luck on your Japanese journey, I wish you fluency with god speed! ^^

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/N.u.N
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thanks-a-bunch!

let me know how genki works! ( I gotta' convince mom to get it for me! :)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Koffee_Owl

Something that I like to do is go back and re-do the lessons I've already gotten to level five in, it helps to reinforce what those lessons taught you. Another bit of advice would be to get a notebook specifically to practice Hiragana and Katakana in. Writing and re-writing characters helps you to recognize them if they're in different fonts or if they're handwritten. Another resource (though I'm sure people have told you before) to use is Tae Kim's Grammar guide, once you have the Hiragana basics, then this website can really clear up a lot for you. Here's the link: http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay2Cruz

Awesome! Thanks! I've heard of Tae Kim. I will start learning that. I've already learned Hiragana and Katakan through Tofugu's mnemonic guide.

Hiragana: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/learn-hiragana/ Katakana: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/learn-katakana/

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Waruiji

I use Kanji Tree for all of my kanji needs! It has options for how many hints you want/when to get hints, different stages of learning, and sections that are like, actual categories. Instead of "food" or "school" it's like "x most popular words" or "first grade recognition"

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hiba-al-Sayf
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'Japanese in Thirty Hours.' I'm definitely not up to the challenge of thirty hours in my schedule, but I do find the book a good resource in giving an overview of the sentence structure without getting into the alphabets (Kanji or Kana). It uses a systematic Romanization for teaching.

For the scripts, 'Remembering the Kana' and 'Remembering the Kanji' would be recommended. The advantage is the use of mnemonics and a complete focus on the script rather than aspects that might distract. Remembering the Kana uses the Kana to write a lot of English words, for instance, because no rule in the world says that you need to learn new words alongside the script. Remembering the Kanji focuses on the meaning and not the pronunciations, for two reasons: (1) There are many pronunciations of the same Kanji which are used in different contexts, and (2) Kanji are logographs, which means that it's one symbol = one meaning, which makes pronunciation just an extra addition that will not help in memorizing the Kanji itself.

Third, to be able to speak Japanese, you need those pronunciations of the Kanji. The most reliable resource in this day and age would be https://jisho.org which allows lookup by various methods (the ones most important for learners are through English meanings and through Romanji or Romanized Japanese).

Though the above site is not the only way you could do this (see https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/look-up-kanji/ ), it is a useful way if you know the meaning but don't know the pronunciation, which, as I've heard a friend say fairly often, will be the case more frequently than you may initially think.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay2Cruz

Thanks for the information! I appreciate it!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crazedbiker

I have been using WaniKani and reading tofugu.com. They're the best! Tofugu has a lot of travel and culture articles as well as some great guides on how to learn the language. They created WaniKani for learning Kanji and vocab super fast. WaniKani uses an SRS (read about it on tofugu) that is ordered to get you to speaking and understanding as fast as possible, and the first 3 levels (a lot of material) are free. I'm working through them right now and then I'll decide if I want to continue on a paid subscription.

I'll probably get one of the grammar books from the library soon and work my way through that. I saw somewhere that someone would handwrite a Genki lesson every morning as a routine to really become fluent in handwriting and grammar.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay2Cruz

Yes! I just received my Genki books and they are really good! I recommend getting them!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/N.u.N
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Alllll-Righty-Then!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomPribyl1

Look for Japanese Ammo lessons on You Tube from Misa. Also I found the Michel Thomas Foundation course and Advanced course on You Tube to be great for beginning with Japanese. Those are audio only courses. You should write Hiragana and Katakana every day - no days off - until the characters are as familiar to you as the English alphabet. Good luck on your journey!

1 week ago
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