"Le professeur marche jusqu'à la plage."

Translation:The teacher walks all the way to the beach.

April 7, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/matthias67
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Would 'marche a la plage' without the jusqu'a affect the current translation at all? Or does this specifically mean he walks up to the beach.

April 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/littlexsparkee

I take it to mean 'right up to', I think you have the right idea

Of course, it marked 'right up to' wrong because it's not exactly literal. You have to be careful w/ these exercises

April 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/alexisbutti

So "il marche jusqu'à la plage" means something like "He walks to the beach (and he will stay there)" while "il marche à la plage" means "He walks to the beach (but he will not stay there)"? I'm not English and the difference in both languages confuse me

May 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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There is nothing in "jusqu'à la plage" that says he will or will not stay there, only that that was his destination. It does not say what he did next.

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/alexisbutti

Confuses, pardon

May 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Gromly

I remember a native explaining this to me. When you say "Le professeur marche jusqu'à la plage", you are saying that the teacher walks until he gets to the beach. When you just say "Le professeur marche à la plage", you are simply saying that he walks to the beach.

September 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/BrainyPirate
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I wrote "all the way to" and it got marked wrong

October 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/arrozfromage
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I was wondering why i wrote that, i guess that's what they taught us.

June 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/carlen97

When does one use "jusqu'à," and when does one use "au?"

January 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/cometslegend
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I think it depends on whether the following noun is masculine or feminine, eg. "jusqu'au ..." for masculine, and "jusqu'a la ..." for feminine.

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/carlen97

thanks!

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tramic685

"all the way (up) to" used to be accepted for 'jusqu'a.' any reason it's not accepted here?

February 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ekleme
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down to the beach?

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/keno42
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...walks until the beach was not liked be DL. Hmmm.

September 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Trudie1962

I also wrote 'until the beach' which means the teacher walked just to the beach. Should be accepted.

March 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Using "until" might fit in a slightly different sentence but in this one, just "to the beach" says it all. It feels rather awkward here.

April 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/joaeil

Why is "walks towards" wrong and "walks to" correct? I can see the distinction in use of the two, but i cannot see the error..

January 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Presuming you're starting from the French, the "jusqu'à" tells you that he is walking (as far as, or right up until he gets there but no further) to the beach. "Walking toward" would be "il marche vers la plage". Hope that helps.

January 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
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"As far as" , the best translation, rightly accepted.

September 4, 2014
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