https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2704

Can you ever sound like a native speaker?

I feel like my pronunciation has improved a lot within the last year. How close you can get to sounding like a native Spanish speaker?

1 week ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NtateNarin
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I once fooled someone who spoke French into thinking I was from France when I introduced myself in French. I doubt I sound completely like a French native, but I think it's a combination of the speed of how I spoke it (like a native), and the confidence I put out, that made him think I was a native French speaker.

Just keep practicing and eventually you will get there with your hard work. Granted, there may be some things you may never seem to get (like the rolling r-sounds for me), and you may still have a thick accent, but it will get better!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2704

Nice! I am hoping if I keep repeating words from music/tv as I hear them, I'll get the more natural Spanish sound. R's actually aren't a hug issue for me when the are followed with vowels - pero, perro, rueda. When followed by the letter d, I struggle! - tarde, verde

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AussieFruitNinja
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Just a heads up (I'm not very good at picking the pronunciation of letters as they're pronounced in words and have had to be taught from others how it's really pronounced starting from learning Spanish on Duo): but the "r" in pero isn't rolled/ trilled, but the double rr (in perro) is).

In tarde and verde the "r" isn't rolled/ trilled, but is pronounced as one flap of the toungue.

To my knowledge the rule is that is rolled/ trilled at the start of a word e.g. rueda; inside words such as with "lr", "nr" and "sr"; as well as "rr".

As far as I have noticed there are hardly any "lr" "nr" or "sr" words, including "alrededor" "enredar" "enriquecer" "enrollar" "honrar" "ronrear" "Israel".

This is less hard and fast when it comes to singing for artistic purposes, as the rolling is more difficult to do and adds rhythm which may not be overly wanted.

That said, I have found that I need to find people who teach me "how it is really pronounced" and with regional variations, for speaking and speaking/reading so that I can understand - examples of the polar differences and difficulties being Spain, Chile, Mexico, with Mexico being easiest for an English Speaker.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
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Yes, you can. It is not easy, but possible.

Superholly is a native speaker of English, she learned Spanish after her 5 years old (if I remember well) but in my opinion, her pronunciation, grammar and accent are perfect Mexican Spanish. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_9MkKAFrFw

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fuzzy285293

I have been told by friends that are native speakers, that my pronunciation is very good, and that I sound like I have been speaking it for a while. I also get told by other friends that are using Duo for Spanish that they are surprised at how well I can pronounce words. I personally feel its from repeating every sentence I write/read out loud. I also keep notes while I am doing lessons, and I am continuously going over those notes, repeating sentences and phrases

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mereade
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You can definitely get to speaking like a native from elsewhere. Probably not as if you were from the same town as the person you are talking to, but still not foreign. Or you can get at least to sounding so little foreign that it won't be interesting enough to make people ask or think about it. :-)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndresGarner
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Of course you can, it just takes time

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChihuahuaFan

By immersing yourself in places that only speak the language you are trying to sound native for, your brain will trick itself and begin thinking that is how you should speak. That is why sometimes if you go to Britain for a while, you may start to get a British accent.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dirk858585
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Maybe Juan - Cómo hablar español como los nativos is of interest too, he explains some things...

However, for me the problem starts with "a native speaker": I am learning a lot of "spanish" vocabulary and pronunciation - I'm afraid (not really) it will end up in a mix of a language between Mexico and Spain... And the problem won't get away as we will go to both countries again this year... So finally I'll stay a German who is trying to speak some Spanish :) I already know people like it and I do not worry about "¿De dónde viene?", because it's a common one even inside a single country.

I wrote it already somewhere else: For our next trip to Mexico I'll change my "Gracias" again, I won't use "coger" and some other minor things...

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_scott
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Yes, you can. It takes a while, but with work you can do it. I can fool people for a bit before it slips out in French and Japanese, but had a lot of college study and time in country.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenHudock
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You definitely can. It takes trying on your part, from the beginning, to abandon your accent. This means speaking everything out loud, getting listening practice each day, and isolating sounds and sentences that are difficult for you. I still can't roll my rr's, and for me, at this point, I'm pretty sure I never will. It's certainly not for a lack of trying, and I can pronounce many more "difficult" sounds, I would say, in languages such as Arabic. I've learned that you should perfect what you can and stop wasting time on what you can't.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LauraleeGo2

Find native speakers to talk to. Have them correct your pronunciation. If you're a passable mimic, it's absolutely possible to get your pronunciation to that level.

But honestly, it's the little rules that language learners miss that give them away.

https://twitter.com/MattAndersonNYT/status/772002757222002688

This is the word order for English adjectives. Native English speakers have no idea this rather complex rule exists, but instantly know when someone does it "wrong". They automatically know that the person speaking may not be a native English speaker, because it sounds "off".

Every language has these. They're often found in word order, or conjugation, but also in word choice. Finding the ones for your target language is the real trick to sounding like a native. ;)

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnGould12

howdy ol girl

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloPaoli

I can help you with your Spanish if you want to. I'm a native speaker. Just let me know

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloPaoli

Where are you from?

1 week ago
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