https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

Is there any difference between 'Mir geht es gut' and 'Es geht mir gut'.

Yo. I was doing a German lesson the other day. And they were talking about something in the lesson about 'Wie geht's' and 'Wie geht es Ihnen' and how you don't say 'Ich bin gut' but 'Es geht mir gut'. Earlier than that I had learnt it as 'Mir geht es gut' but I have heard it spoken as 'Es geht mir gut'. So I was wondering if there's any differences between these two versions? Are there any cases where I should use one over the other? Are these spoken in different parts of Germany or is it more like a personal preference?

Danke für die Hilfe.

1 week ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Robert-Alexan
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The earlier you mention mir the more emphasis you put on mir. Put it at the beginning of the sentence and you imply that you are doing well but you are either unsure how others feel or you know that others feel worse.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

Ah I see. So if someone is having a bad day but then they ask you how your day was going you'd go Mir geht es gut. But if someone just asks you like as a greeting you'd just say Es geht mir gut. That explains alot. Thankyou :D

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert-Alexan
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Yes, that's pretty much how I would use it.

Another example: I'd never say Es geht mir gut, aber wie geht es dir?. I'd always prefer Mir geht es gut und wie geht es dir?.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cluney2

okay. I'll make sure I try to remember that.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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Robert - Das macht Sinn. Robert ist dein Vorname, oder?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gottogetout

hi, "it makes sens" is a typical English expression and may be a nord american expression mor precisely, isn't it? I guess, then, that your sentence is a literal translation. Is that expression naturally used in German since decades ? I have the intuition that the answer must be no. But I'm may be wrong.

in French we don't say "ça a du sens". we would says "C'est logique", for ex. Neither in Spanish.

then I'm wondering, how a German would generally express that?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Gottogetout,

Das/es ergibt Sinn' would be the correct German sentence. But a few years ago journalists startet to translate it literally to 'das/es macht Sinn'. Slowly but surely it changed from wrong German to 'bad' German and nowadays it is quite common to say so. But I have to admit I don't like it and I'm always correcting it, can't help myself. Still that's the way a language goes, right? It evolves.

The next change in my guess will be how to talk about a year. In German you say 'Wir haben den Beschluss 2004 gefasst.' But in the last years you can hear (even read) more and more 'Wir haben den Beschluss in 2004 gefasst'. The word 'in' is actually unnecessary and (imho) wrong unlikely in English. But you can hear it more and more often.

best regards, Angel

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gottogetout

in France, we have the Angliscisms, but also faults that everyone is happily transmitting to the others. so that today if you speak "correctly", if you apply certain rules: you are the weird guy!

(By the way: to be frank, your picture scares me, man! what's this thing? That's really weird!)

it's the magic of human-to-human transmission. in other words: everyone wants to speak "like everyone else", not to differentiate themselves, not to look different and to risk to be indexed by the group!

A known experience : suppose you enter a room where there are 10 people. there is a yellow apple on a table. A man with a white coat asks what color is this apple? each person says that it's blue. Arrive your turn: it is proved that you will probably say, too, that it is blue! you will convince yourself that it is impossible for it to be yellow despite you SEE it's yellow! isn't it crazy? It's the same with the language. I do not speak about faults on complex rules, but simple things.
we can hear a lot of people, including journalists, saying "eKceteta" instead of "eTcetera". they say "elle a l'air heureuSE" instead of "...heureux". ( the word air is masculin) we say "des fois" ( as a child would talk) instead of "Parfois". "Parfois" can sound like in a book, like intellectual.

"t'as dit quoi ?" you said what ? instead of "qu'est ce que tu as dit" ? for ex.

"Pourquoi les prix augmentent ?" instead of "Pourquoi les prix augment-ils ?

the thing is that people think and speak always faster and faster. it's pathetic!

smartphones, web... text messages ...

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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Thanks, Angel - I will change my ways. As you know, I like to stick to proper language, whether in German or English.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

I know that, so the answer was also for you. :-) I still think it's better German to say 'ergibt' instead of 'macht'. But as I said language evolves and at a point in the future my opinion/understanding of language in this case maybe will be outdated. But until then I would recommend 'ergibt'. greets Angel

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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No, it is pretty standard German, oder?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laeckphaettn
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Not quite (yet). This expression has become more and more widely used for the last years, especially in colloquial speech. It is not yet considered standard German, though, I'd say. The more "correct" expression would be "das ergibt Sinn". Yet, as I said, this is changing - see also https://blog.supertext.ch/2016/08/wenn-sprache-wandert-sinn-machen-oder-sinn-ergeben/

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gottogetout

it is probably of course an influence of English. in French the expression "it makes sens" y doesn't exist at all.
to be precise you can say "ça a du sens", and in Spanish too : ' "tiene sentido" BUT it's absolutely not used like "It makes sens to me"

we have the same phenomena in France. For example, many young people today say "sérieux ?" as a translation of "seriously?" Before they would have said, for example, "ah bon ? " 15-20 years ago we did not talk like that. English is omnipresent everywhere since a while.

in Spain, I recently noticed a great influence of French. (Spain has for decades been looking toward France with a sort of admiration in some ways. The News talked about France very frequently in the News TV when I was a child)
Some words formerly used in TV News have simply been replaced by other words related to a French word. It's disconcerting for me but it's like that. An example : to say "the day", they use a lot the word "la jornada" ( in French "la journée" instead of "el dia". ("la journée" is not 'the journey' by the way!)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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ChristianB - Danke, I got it from movies and reading current articles.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Axeleng
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There are no differences, in german both versions are possible and usual, you can choose between them

1 week ago
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