https://www.duolingo.com/Keirileei

I'm getting confused with Chinese and Korean (I don't know either)

Okay, okay, this is the dumbest thing ever but, I learnt Korean has some Chinese related (??) words in some stuff so now I sometimes pronounce Chinese symbols like Korean?...

I'm learning Chinese at school, and some Chinese characters look like Korean characters/Symbols to me. So at school I keep thinking "Oh, this is Korean" So I read the Chinese character wrong. For example ㅅ and 人. I keep pronouncing '人' like 'S'. And it makes no sense because 人 is obviously different to 'ㅅ'. This is starting to become a bad habit, does anyone have any way of like.. get out of this habit? It sounds dumb but,,, eh.

(This happened to me with Dutch and German to once... oof) (Also mark is a bird-)

-Thanks ^^

1 week ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/elliotmceachran

For the longest time when I was learning Korean and Japanese together, I read コ as 그.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TTV_IamAmemeHA

lol

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiyomice
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It's not dumb, it actually makes a lot of sense! Many people get languages mixed up when learning more than one at once. My advice would be to hold off on learning one of them for now. Since you are learning Chinese at school, I would say keep learning Chinese for now but come to a short halt on Korean. When your fluency in Chinese has improved to where you are no longer likely to get them mixed up, then you can slowly start adding Korean back into your learning.

I hope this helps and I wish you good luck on your learning!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BluePrinc
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Usually to learn similar languages at same time can be confusing.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredrikVC
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Chinese and Korean aren't similar languages.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kieran-Moore
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How can you say that Chinese and Korean don’t have similarities???

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KangBaekho

The only rlly similar language is Russian and Mongolian, bc they use the same alphabet :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredrikVC
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All languages "borrow" words from their neighbors. China is one hell of a neighbor, so you'll find Chinese loan words in many other Asian languages. But just because the word is borrows from Chinese does not mean the written form is also borrowed. When you use "chop" in English, you don't use Chinese symbolism. Why would the Koreans?

When linguists talk about language, they're speaking about vocabulary, not the symbolism used to represent the language in a written form. The Korean symbolism had nothing to do with the Chinese symbolism. Korea probably has the best written form of any language. It's purely phonetic, and (unlike languages using Roman or other "alphabets"), it also indicates how the syllables break down.

Korean doesn't have any close neighbors. Neither does Japanese. English is related to German, with a bunch of loan words from French and other languages. The end result is so bad that (according to the author of Babel) English speakers have a harder time learning another language thank most people.

Chinese symbolism is not phonetic. Don't try to pronounce written Chinese. Just memorize the ten thousand symbols (plus or minus a bunch) that you'll need to understand written Chinese.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/McPwny

now what filthy heathen animal would downvote this?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/McPwny

hangul is only a phonetic system. about half the words are chinese derived yeah, but confusing 人 and ㅅ would be like confusing Д and A

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TTV_IamAmemeHA

Hate to break it to you but Chinese and Japanese are not even close to the same thing

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KangBaekho

Tru tru, but they do share the same symbols for a few things like love

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KangBaekho

If you look at (人) like a man's legs walking it kinda helps... but I dont know what you should do to remember (s) in Korean... sorry :( <3

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RestRabbitRest
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Well 'linguistically' Chinese, Japanese and Korean are not in the same language family, but really? To a common language learner there are tons of things that look similar.

All three share Chinese characters - even though they read differently in Korean and Japanese, the meanings are mostly similar. Korean and Japanese share even more, especially the ways how the particles are placed, and sometimes the expression itself too.

Apart from Keirileei's questions here is to point out just how similar the characters look, I'd still encourage people to give a try on all three languages, for their similarities.

** Apologies for my poor English; it's not my mother tongue

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/McPwny

what looks similar? its not the writing system, its not the grammar, not even the pronunciation. i dont know what the part where korean has chinese characters is supposed to mean either.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sophiafilm
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They have a lot of similarities, but you will see it only when you will start learning Chinese. Korean has Chinese characters it's called Hanja, in the news where you can read the running message at the bottom of the screen (I can't find how you guys call this thing) Hanja is not a rare thing. Also, legal documents have a lot of them.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/McPwny

about half the words are hanja derived, but the way its converted is to take the chinese word's pronunciation, and jam it into the nearest fitting syllable block. you can kind of glimpse the chinese noun patterns through hangul, but ehhhhh. i guess its a little bit similar, but not really.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtemisLil1

I get it I would read Japanese in Chinese and vice versa, and would start a Chinese conversation in Korean... It makes sense, don't worry :)

5 days ago
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