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Italian from English

I’d like to know why Duo uses the verb “manca” to translate “Living alone, I miss my mother’s cooking.” Why isn’t it “manco”? Is “cooking” what we’re referring to here?

4 days ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CivisRomanus

Mancare = to be missing (to someone)

step (1): turn the English construction into the Italian one.

Living alone, I miss my mother’s cooking. → Living alone, my mother's cooking is missing to me.

step (2): translate the sentence.

Living = vivendo
alone = solo or da solo (in feminine form: sola / da sola)
my mother's cooking = la cucina di mia madre
is missing to me = mi manca.

The sentence can be arranged in several ways:

Vivendo solo, la cucina di mia madre mi manca.

Vivendo solo, mi manca la cucina di mia madre.

La cucina di mia madre, vivendo solo, mi manca.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda7Italian

Wonderful, thankyou!

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda7Italian

Ciao... It's like piacere. To me the colour orange is pleasing = mi piace il colore arancione. So, my mother's cooking is missing to me. "Mi manca la cucina di mia madre". I'm sure CivisRomanus or another madrelingua can better explain the technicalities but this is how I remember these two tricky words. Ciao...

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BankVault4

"Manca" means miss or I miss you so if someone is leaving you would say "Lo manco" or, "I'll miss you". "Manca" is the past tense of "manco" when you are saying that you miss something. For example: if you miss your mom then you would say "Manca mia Madre" or, "I miss my Mom". I hope this cleared things up for you! :)

3 days ago
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