"The people are without a course."

Translation:Las personas están sin rumbo.

5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/robotochalk

Kind of a weird sentence in English...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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I think duolingo also accepts "The people are without direction" here. Which sounds a little better to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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This site http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/rumbo says "sin rumbo" means "aimless", "with no fixed destination".

"They are without direction" does sound better than "They are without a course", but it still sounds odd. And it sounds like they haven't been told what to do or where to go, rather than just "aimless" which doesn't have any sense of somebody else providing direction. I don't think "without direction" can mean "without having any direction in mind".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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"Like a rolling stone" as Bob Dylan said.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wdstout66
wdstout66
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"With no direction home..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JudieElisabeth

Like a complete unknown...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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We might say "directionless" in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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Actually, come to think of it, we'd probably just say "lost".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jOiejo
jOiejo
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absolutely!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I think "directionless" is better. "lost" is too general.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jOiejo
jOiejo
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gotcha ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jOiejo
jOiejo
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What exactly is "too general" about "lost" as opposed to the more wordy (or syllabic than directionless") They both mean without destination.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Maybe I should have said "has too many other meanings" than "is too general". I think the most common interpretation of "the people are lost" would be that the people don't know where they are.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelAmos2

You can be on path to your destination without direction and without a sense of being lost. I can take a bus and be advised where it will take me albeit I dont know exactly where that is.

Lacking directions is not equal to being lost.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Directionless. Está bien. Lost means something different. Methinks this is another computer-generated sentence. See comments below confirming that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timmyshanti
timmyshanti
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Seriously? )) i think not

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I gather it's strange in Spanish. The translation "Las personas están sin rumbo" gets no hits in Google. The unaccepted La gente no tienen rumbo got a few.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave611218

DL accepted "La gente está sin rumbo" - I was pleased that I remembered to keep "La gente" singular and used "está".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

why estan?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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It's a condition. Position, Location, Action, Condition, and Emotion.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulaswenson

why not A la gente le falta un curso

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Con un cambio a "le falta dirección" - ¡trata hecho! Hace falta un curso sounds like a course at school.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulaswenson

Gracias

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/da.razo.m

Why not "sin ningún rumbo" That's another way used in Mx

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speightman

I put this and was told no

las gentes estan sin un rumbo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHouse989

Why "sin un curso" by "sin rumbo" (no un)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlueJelloElf

All the rumbo sentences I've encountered so far are awkward.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/negrachula93

Why couldn't it be La gente estaN sin rumbo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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This site says when a collective noun is immediately followed by a verb, it is always singular. http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/f/collectivef.htm.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MirenDelOlmo

I am Spanish from Spain. I am helping my husband doing the course, and I am finding some unexpected changes, which I put down to the fact the people involved are Latin American. I can hear it in their accents. The most common Spanish translation to this sentence should be "Las personas NO TIENEN rumbo".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prestoncox

Is "gentes" not a thing? I guess people is already plural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IngridNN2

First paso: clue was "spend" Now course. Clue was curso or clase.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MavisClose1

Ambiguous--I thought they were with out an academic course..thus "curso." Not a great sentence.....

2 weeks ago
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