1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Portuguese
  4. >
  5. "A banda tocou ontem."

"A banda tocou ontem."

Translation:The band played yesterday.

May 22, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asherbennaphtali

"A banda tocou ontem."
Translation: "The band has played yesterday."

This is not good English.

We don't use the perfect tense with adverbs or adverbial phrase that indicate the precise time of an event in the past.

Much more natural is "The band played yesterday."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

This issue has now been fixed. Thank you all for your feedback and reports.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TommyDuque

How do we know that they are not referring to the Beatles song "Yesterday"? And what if we want to say that they played "Yesterday" yesterday?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Actually, they would probably just say, «A banda tocou, "Yesterday."». They do not frequently translate the names of the songs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlos_Boria

More like: A banda tocou, "Yesterday" ontem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Right, I was just answering his first question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cat.taft

You guys are just killing his joke hahaha let it be!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

♫ Deixa-o estar, deixa-o estar, deixa-o estar, deixa-o estar. Buscando palavras de sabedoria, deixa-o estar. ♪♪ XP I bet you did not even notice what you said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cat.taft

I did, it was a pun!! hahaha I was really proud of myself! ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlos_Boria

It would be something like: A banda tocou "Ontem", ontem.
I like your thinking Tommy!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlos_Boria

The English translation needs to be in simple past as is the Portuguese sentence. "The band played yesterday" The English translation here appears to be in the Past Perfect tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

I do believe you mean present perfect, as past perfect would be "The band had played...."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TommyDuque

Thank you both, you made it much more interesting and educational than my silly 'wink' at Duo for the unconventional English phrasing that it was suggested. Same that was pointed by the original commentary. Abraços.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cat.taft

Well... I responded "the band played yesterday" which is the actual correct response, and the alternate response given was "the band has played yesterday" which is actually incorrect English. That is not proper grammar. And to say "the band had played" would be "a banda tinha tocado" but to say that is less common than to just say "a banda tocou"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Would it be acceptable in this context: "The band has played yesterday...and today!" I have been speaking English all my life, and I am still unclear about the special restrictions of the present perfect tense. That is true; you would also need something else that happened in the past but after the band playing to use «tinha tocado»/"had played."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cat.taft

No, you would never say "the band has played yesterday." You would say "the band played yesterday." If you wanted to use "has" in that type of context you could say "the band has already played" like if someone arrived late and was asking if they missed the show, or "the band has played here before." I honestly do not know enough about the nomenclature of grammar to explain why that is, but there are really specific ways to phrase this in English. In Portuguese they have these conjugations, but in practice (or at least informal speech) they tend to be eschewed in favor of the simpler past tense conjugations. To say "the band has played yesterday" is 100% incorrect and would flag the speaker as not a native speaker. Though, you could say the band HAD played yesterday (which is more like tinha tocadao) and say like "the band had played yesterday for 3 hours, so they felt they really earned a trip to the bar to get hammered." English is weird!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlennaSol

The rule about English perfect tenses is that the action in perfect tense has to occur before a certain point in time. For present perfect tense, the point in time is right now. For past perfect tense, the point in time is in the past. Adverbs like 'already' and 'before' are often used to indicate a certain point in time for past perfect tense. The actual simple past tense verb that sets the context for using past perfect may not be in the same sentence, but it does occur somewhere in the context of the conversation or story. In present perfect, the simple present tense that sets the context may be implied by the circumstances.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Loved your response! Makes total sense, obrigado!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlennaSol

Native speakers, is there a problem with the pronunciation of "tocou"? In the regular speed I heard 'toco' with 2 vowels and the accent on the 1st syllable. The slow speed had all 3 vowel sounds and the accent on the 2nd syllable. Which is correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Yes, the stress should be on the second syllable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlennaSol

Thank you. I'll report it next time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crazytongu

Is "tocar" a verb used only in Brasil or is it used by the portuguese as well?

Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.