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  5. "Esto nos ha llevado meses."

"Esto nos ha llevado meses."

Translation:This has taken us months.

April 8, 2013

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

Me ha llevado meses aprender español.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcontex

Decades for me. No joke. And this is supposed to be one of the easiest to learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

I feel your pain. I actually began studying Spanish decades ago myself, in college, but forgot most of it because I did not keep it up. Last year I started using DuoLingo to relearn Spanish and it took me 9 months to complete the tree ( https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5980811 ). I do not consider myself fluent yet, but at least now I have a strong foundation to work off of while really learning the language. Hopefully one day I will be competent in it. Good luck to you as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susancave

I have had a very similar experience. I think what DuoLingo really does best is imprint us with stock phrases which we then modify. Perhaps that is the way all languages are learned: repetition, repetition, and repetition with some slight modification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_LittleBatman_

Nice review. Your story is certainly an inspiration for everyone. Continua, no te desanimes. Keep it up! Good luck DeanG6.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveHarris809825

My husband has just pointed out to me that the "Duolingo method" is similar to taking driving lessons.

Although there is obviously no formal competency test on the way, it drills you enough to give you confidence to talk to native Spanish speakers and read Spanish etc. This gets you "on the road" to finally gain the experience required.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

You have to start trying to read in Spanish now as much as possible and try to converse more tambien en espanol. I would recommend the immersion tab up above ;D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

Yes thank you. You're right. I need to start reading. Also it would help to chat/talk with a native speaker in real life conversation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1752

People will trade English for Spanish (or whatever) over Skype or Duo (the Gmail equivalent). Some schools will also put you in a virtual classroom with one or two students. The latter isn't free, but it's also not terribly expensive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Good point, sadly though, Immersion is no longer available. 30Jan18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talca

Llevar for the road weary. My dictionary lists 12 different meanings for this verb. There are additional reflexive meanings too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattcolor

It's tough, but it's hard to get too mad at this considering that people learning English have 19 definitions of "get" and 50 definitions of "set" to wrangle with. (Counting verb definitions only, per dictionary.com)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1752

Actually, there's a lot more. The first two verb forms I give in ESL are "is" and "get".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashley394144

the English word "run" has the most definitions from what I've heard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcontex

This has taken me months to translate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SevenYearIllini

Hmm, not sure I follow this one. Any insight? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rocko2012

I've not covered that section in "Verbs: Present Perfect" yet but the only thing that strikes me as odd is the singular third person "ha" here. Obviously it is agreeing with the singular "esto" and "nos"/"us" is just extra info. "Esto ha llevado meses" = "This has taken months" according to google translator.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tylerthehun

Yes, it is 'this' that is doing the 'taking', thus 'ha llevar' is singular. 'nos' simply specifies that it has taken US months, rather than having taken months on its own. If it was a more direct "We've been doing ____ for months" the verb would be in nosotros form i believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mandyturtle

this has taken US months. sorry the nos is not "extra"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rocko2012

It is extra info compared to the example I listed without it "Esto ha llevado meses" = "This has taken months". Obviously with it it changes the translation. That's why I wrote "nos"/"us".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaDunste

Didn't help when I read mesas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PotatoSanta

Is this the most natural way to say this? I would have used 'durar' or something


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bmr209
  • 1716

I would have used "tomar"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alezzzix

I think so. Just out of curiosity, how would you use "durar" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PotatoSanta

Maybe 'hemos durado meses en esto' or something, although that's changing things a bit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alezzzix

That does not sound good, "durar" does not have that meaning, but there are other possible translations, for instance: "Hemos tardado meses en esto / esto nos ha tardado meses", or "esto nos ha tomado meses".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/happyhealt

Maybe 1 Maybe 2 more. Almost there. I may do a victory dance when I finish this course!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zziill

at this rate it's going to take me months to complete this one lesson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaDunste

This has taken US months vs This has taken months

nos serves the same purpose as "us". otherwise it's a lot less specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annie44

Query about pronunciation . 'll' seems to be pronounced differently when at the beginning of a word? - e.g. in "llevado" compared with "ella".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TilEulenspiegel

Some experienced Spanish speakers here have mentioned that different voices used in the spoken exercises have different accents, such as with the "ll" in "ella" sounding like more like soft "j" rather than a "y" in some cases, which they attribute to a Cuban accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ant885895

Are you talking about gaucho accent (zheísmo)? "yo" pronounced as "zjo" etc?

It began in Argentina but has spread all over. Pop culture sometimes considers it a boost to machismo.

"y" is not pronounced exactly as "j". It is somewhere between the "s" in measure and "j" and "y".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1752

I suspect TilEulenspiegel is talking about something more general. The Argentinian s, y, z, and ll do sound french to me, but, for example, on an ad on TV, I hear what sounds like "jamanos ja" for "llamanos ya" (call us right now). I don't hear that J sound (like in English) in European spanish, but I sure hear it all over in New World spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JANBOEVINK

My translation would have been: This has left us months (to do something). Is this a possible translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1752

I think that would be "Esto nos ha dejado meses (para hacer más)", but I'm not a native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JANBOEVINK

Thanks Gernt. I struggle a bit, confusing "llevar" and "dejar". Not sure why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 1752

Besides, of course, that llevar is commonly used for carry, take, bring, and wear, not to mention "has/have been here" and many other things, while dejar is just as ambiguous. You should see the English students trying wrap their heads around "get".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JANBOEVINK

Thanks gernt, I got it. I am not alone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/14479

"This took us months" - surely ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alastair169644

That has taken us months?

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