https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardGiordano

Routledge Audios Available Online for Free

Routledge has a series on Colloquial Languages for a pretty considerable amount of languages, and the audios for their courses are all posted online:

https://www.routledgetextbooks.com/textbooks/colloquial/default.php#languages

Ideally you would buy the book (or get a copy from the library) to follow along, but even if you don't have it the audio is still a good resource.

February 24, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

This happened a couple of years ago or so. Unfortunately they raised the prices of all their books at the same time (one would have thought that no longer having to produce physical CDs would have been a cost saving that could have been passed on to the consumer, but apparently not).
If anyone wants a particular Routledge book, I recommend always checking second-hand platforms (abebooks, alibris, amazon marketplace, etc.) and eBay before shelling out for a new one; some of the 'colloquial' books are very good, but they are all over-priced.

You'd probably need at least a prior middling grasp of the language to get much from the audio tracks without the corresponding book—they are just dialogues, not pimsleur-type lessons.

February 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmegaGmaster

It's also not very difficult to find PDFs of the books online. I have Colloquial Somali, Mongolian, Tibetan, and Latvian in PDF format just by searching around online.

nəvighsəqaat aat

February 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

This is quite true, although this constitutes illegal copyright infringement, which I understand DL takes a dim view of, and therefore am not going to advocate.
Personally, I much prefer having proper books, too, which are easier on the eyes, and can be perused away from the computer. I picked up the Tibetan and Mongolian books (with CDs) for a few pounds each on eBay; the former is one of the better ones, in my opinion. It is harder to find books on the less-popular languages this way, however.

February 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

Turns out the pirates are the main source of income for a lot of content creators.

Besides... it is the people who make money off of reselling things they bought that spread that "piracy is bad myth"... as Piracy hurts the people reselling stuff more than anybody else, and ❤❤❤❤ those guys.

That being said, if you have some spare money, throw it at creators who make stuff you like. Except not in coin form... they complain when you do that.

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

How can an author (or anyone else, for that matter) make money from people pirating his work? Most writers make the majority of their money from commissions from sales, with only a small minority of already-successful writers getting substantial lump sums from publishing companies in advance.
I like free stuff as much as anyone else, but not paying people for their hard work tends to result in undesirable consequences such as the raising of prices and the inclusion of ads or sponsored content in texts to try to compensate for loss of revenue, or simply no longer producing content as it is an uneconomic use of their time.

Of course, those who are most vocally against piracy are those who have the most to lose pecuniarily—big companies, publishing houses, etc., that release content but do not create it (and sometimes take too big a cut themselves); however, they do still pay, and in many cases provide the livelihoods of, those who actually spend their time creating it.
Piracy is bad. In the field of language resources, in particular, it's certainly going to damage someone who writes a book on (say) Tibetan many orders of magnitude more than it's going to damage the multinational company that publishes it.

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmegaGmaster

Funny you mention sales being affected. The EU did a study that found that piracy (for the most part) does not harm sales.

That being said, I don't really support pirating stuff from indie developers and smaller content creators as much, given what you said in your last paragraph.

nəvighsəqaat aat

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

@OmegaGmaster

Your link only states that it boosts the sale of games, which tend to spread quickly by word-of-mouth through a young, technologically-literate audience on the internet anyway. I don't have time to read a 304-page paper right at the moment, but I very much doubt that this applies equally to books on Tibetan grammar.

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmegaGmaster

This is why I support piracy, except when it comes to pirating indie games.

Though, to be honest, I haven't pirated much beyond language books and Adobe Suite on my now defunct MacBook. And after switching to Linux, I'm probably not gonna be pirating any software anytime soon.

nəvighsəqaat aat

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slogger

These are great, especially w/ a book. Thanks!

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobtheswag

wow this is incredible! thank you so much for this

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue.Kelly

Love it! Thanks so much for posting, these are really useful exercises. I particularly like the fact that they come in easily accessible chunks; I usually much prefer practicing reading or writing skills, but these are fun.

February 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dreadlock.Dawnie

This is awesome!! Thanks! :)

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhxBob

Super! Thank You.

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Herr_General

thank you for the suggestion!

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenny759980

Terrific! Merci!!

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

I will check this out. Thankies!

February 27, 2019
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