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  5. しゅっしんです vs 人です?

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fifkee

しゅっしんです vs 人です?

I don't see the difference.

I write “中国しゅっしんです,” and then I can also write “中国人です.”

What is the difference? Sometimes I get marked wrong, and sometimes I don't. It's irritating when I don't know when to use A or B.

https://puu.sh/CSmYm/848afd4606.png (image. if you wish, i will reupload on imgur)

In this sentence, 人です is used.

https://puu.sh/CSn2g/8c39d64cec.png

And then in this sentence, 人です is also used. But it also suggests for me to use " アメリカしゅっしんです。"

https://puu.sh/CSn60/4e28386d6d.png

And then, I'm still referring to myself, and I'm still referring to my "place of origin,” and it's still marking me wrong. What am I missing here?

Do I use jindesu when I'm referring to someone other than myself?

February 27, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bokura

"中国出身(しゅっしん)" meaning is "from China". *"from" = "I was born and raised"

"中国人" meaning is Chinese(person).

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.T.Gregor

No, I think it's because the sentences are not fully equivalent. Yes, they effectively mean the same thing in both English and Japanese, but they are not literally the same. So using 出身 to translate "I am from the US" is right, but using it to say "I am Chinese" (i e. a Chinese person) is not. For the latter you need 人. I would agree that, if DL wants to be picky about this, they shouldn't have accepted your answer in the middle sentence. Either accept not-so-literal translations or don't, but mix and match is confusing.

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fifkee

Take my 5 lingots, sir!

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.T.Gregor

Why, thank you! Very kind. All the best with your learning.

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonsieurPaburu

しゅっしんです is the country you are from 人です is your nationality

Some people are born in one country but may have multiple nationalities, or you could be naturalized citizen; for example, someone could have been born in India, but be an American.

So in short, it's the difference between saying "I am from the US" and "I am American".

So they're similar, but not the same thing. Hope this helps, good luck with the studies ! がんばれましょう!

March 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BJCUAl

Not only country of origin. It can be any place (town, city, state) that one is from.

がんばましょう!

March 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QueenTionna

when you say shiyuushindesu it mean you are from there but when you say jindesu then you are that nationality so the difference between the sentences at the top is 'I am from China' and 'I am Chinese' and the reason why it suggested it was because the sentence was 'I am from the U.s' so you use shiyuushindesu (I couldnt write in the Japanese Characters)

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BJCUAl

カナダ出身のアメリカ人です. I'm an American from Canada.

February 28, 2019
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