1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Norwegian (Bokmål)
  4. >
  5. Is the "k" in "kjøtt" pronunc…

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Is the "k" in "kjøtt" pronunced? Or is it silent?

February 28, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmareloTiago

The Norwegian KJ sound doesn't correspond exactly to an English sound but sounds a lot like sh-, as in short. The Norwegians say it with something like a broad smile.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

Yes, 'kj' represents a sound, so the 'k' isn't pronounced per se. The 'kj' sound is a palatal sound, made by raising the back of the tongue towards the palate. When I say 'kjøtt' I don't smile at all :) I don't move my lips more than I do when I say 'øh'.

There's a whole Wikipedia-article on the sound (there is one such article for pretty much every sound there is in any language). Maybe that can be of interest.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Thanks that would be really helpful. Thank you for your answer :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Ok thanks, it reminds me the ''-ch'' sound in German. I guess they are similiar. Anyway thank you for your answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

It's pretty much like the 'ch' in German nicht, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenMang

I agree with you both, it's like that. Maybe it's a little bit softer or less forceful, in a slightly different area of the mouth, but it basically sounds the same. A lot of people don't really say it that way, though. Many tend to say it as a "sh" sound, so don't worry too much about it if it trips you up. If you find yourself in a tongue-twister and want to avoid the 'kj' sound, saying it as a 'sh' definitely sounds better than staying closer to 'k'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Thank you ^-^

I have studied German for 5 years so it is simplier to pronunce the ''k'' as ''ch'' in German. I though it was the same sound because they sounded similiar ^-^

Anyway thank you for your answer! :)

Learn Norwegian (Bokmål) in just 5 minutes a day. For free.