"The doctor takes appointments on Mondays."

Translation:Hālāwai ke kauka ma nā Pōʻakahi.

March 1, 2019

15 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

ka vs na

ma ka Po'akahi - on Mondays in general

ma na Po'akahi - on some finite set of Mondays


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PsilentPspeaking

"Takes appointments" wasn't translating for me when I hovered over it. Not sure if it's just me. I looked up hālāwai since it was capitalized in the wordbank so I figured it must be the verb.

Wehewehe says:

"Hālāwai:

  1. nvi. Meeting; to meet. hoʻo.hā.lā.wai To arrange a meeting."

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

what word bank?? I don't get a word bank, just three choices of translation! Is there a "settings" link I'm missing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulasueb

see the "make easier" button at bottom screen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graeme721848

In spite of the wehewehe reference above when I tried ho’ohālāwai it is not accepted- so flagged. No?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryKaHaumana

I'm not sure of the question here, but ho’ohālāwai means "to arrange a meeting."

https://hilo.hawaii.edu/wehe/?q=halawai#w2w2-3198

As the grammar says, the hoʻo- prefix "makes the word it is attached to into a hamani (transitive verb)."

https://hawaiian-grammar.org/current/#h.60a52bvxhavm

But in the example sentence, it's an intransitive. Even the "cause to" aspect doesn't really come into play: the doctor doesn't cause the appointment to be arranged, he just has one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graeme721848

Super answer as always GaryKH. I laughed cos as a doctor I hope I caused the patient to come back for an appointment or when I asked the clerk I caused it to be booked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryKaHaumana

My pleasure Graeme. Actually it strikes me (though as a doctor maybe you know better) the problem here is the English. We don’t really a good verb for hālāwai, right? We can’t say “Graeme appointments on Mondays.” You take/accept/see patients, give appointments, etc. But until now I’ve never noticed we don’t really have a verb with that meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenTuttle

Why no "Aia" at the beginning of the sentence? Aia hālāwaki ke kauka ma nā Pōʻakahi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K-Bueno

If I understand correctly, "Aia" is used to say "There is" (something static) eg. a game, concert, party, two black dogs at a park, etc. This sentence is describing an action that occurs on a dynamic basis (in this example "on Mondays").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

could it be "i na Po'akahi" or only "ma" with respect to days?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryKaHaumana

My understanding is that either works, but many prefer “ma” when talking about a specific location in time or space.

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