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  5. "Que lis-je ?"

"Que lis-je ?"

Translation:What do I read?

April 9, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flawlessavatar

It's very hard to understand the text to speech. It sounds like que lige


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

In real life, I very much doubt that anyone would build his/her question like that, if he/she wants to be understood. we would rather say: "qu'est-ce que je lis ?" (standard) or "je lis quoi ?" (casual/oral).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Well that's because it's how it's pronounced. The "s" in "lis" is a mute consonant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_adger

The slow version not only doesn't separate the words lis and je, but it smears them together even more! Also the "q" sounds like a 'c' in this word, but like "q" in other words (eg 'quoi')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

I'm not able to listen to the slow version, so I can't comment on it. But as I said above, "lis" and "je" are pronounced very close to each other, almost as if it was one word.

As for the "q", it should never sound like a "ss" sound, and always like a "k" sound (when it's pronounced of course). The "c" can be either a "k" sound or a "ss" sound.

If the slow audio seems wrong to you, please use "report a problem".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveT

Okay so hearkening back to hs French class, Mme. Gray told us that inversion is not used with the first person with the sometimes exception of "puis-je" (but never she insisted with "peux-je". She also said you drop the definite article after a form of ĂȘtre (Je suis marie vs. Je suis un marie). So some clarification here please. Was Mme Gray totally off the mark, or was she presenting the strict grammatical rule which is totally ignored in every day speech. Imagine if you will the frustration of English learners who had a Mrs. Gris tell them they absolutely use whom and not who as the direct object and in prepositional phrases when the entire native English speakers will say "Who did you ask" rather than "Whom did you ask."

I'm pretty sure she would have fits and spells if I didn't say the above as "Qu'est-ce que je lis?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Armanx

what i do read is wrong ?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Yes it's wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Armanx

why "what i do read ?" is wrong can you explain me ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Because it's how the interrogative form in English works.

You don't say :

"Who you are ?"

But rather :

"Who are you ?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LawrenceBarker

Why is it "que" and not "quoi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"quoi" is not placed at the head of a sentence: "Je lis quoi ?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scttcmrn

Why is "What should I read?" incorrect here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

What should I read? = Que devrais-je lire ? (conditional)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolmersereau

inversion with "je"..........non, non, non!!! only with 3 or so verbs is it allowed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lmacmaui

So, I have just finished the chapter on questions in 'French grammer for dummies' which states that je is never inverted with the verb for the question format. So I am confused because duo has offered a few. Sitesurf, can you help? What am I to believe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Yes, it can be inverted as well. But subject-verb inversion for questions is not really common French, it's more used in formal and written French anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

There are still a few fixed phrases that are used in speech, like "que sais-je ?" or "puis-je ?" but Arjofocolovi is right, formal questions, although much shorter than standard questions, have become obsolete in everyday contemporary French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlyBella

The voice check thinks I spoke the punctuation wrong. How does one misspeak a punctuation mark?

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