https://www.duolingo.com/Ilya_Elante

I'm terrified of learning Kanji

I've only been on here a few days and the hiragana has already gotten me intimidated. I've been practicing writing them. Does that generally help you memorize them?

March 10, 2019

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Hubinou

Don't worry, everything comes with patience and dedication.

Try memorizing by little chunks, the 5 "a-row" series one day, then the "ka-row" the next day, etc.

flash cards helped me a lot, also by little chunks, as well as putting similar hiragana next to each other (ha - ho), (chi-ra), etc

See my contrinution to this post :
https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/30829177

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne

Here is a hiragana mnemonics chart that I found: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/hiragana-mnemonics-chart/ The tofugo site has tons of info and info on kanji too!

Hope this helps you!

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferLa403535

Tofugu is the BEST for learning hiragana and katakana!

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot

Writing will help a ton with Kanji and Kana! Personally I like to write the Kanji on the left side of a paper, hiragana next to that to help me remember the pronunciation of the Kanji and the meaning in English on the right. It’s a good way to help you get used to multiple systems of writing. (Katakana will be easy once you get used to Hiragana; don’t worry, it’s a lot but both Kanas aren’t hard to memorize, and there is a list of official kanji that are used that is manageable.)

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul.II

There is no reason to be terrified of kanji although I admit that mastering them is a challenge.

Kana (hira- and kata-) are relatively easy and you can, if you put time and effort to it, learn these in a matter of days (even one day per syllabary is not unreasonable). For learning kana, I would suggest using a chair, a desk, a pencil and a notebook :)

Go to some website that shows you the stroke order and practice writing these characters in the notebook for a day. For the practice you will want to use simple Japanese words and duome (select the "Words" tab) has such a list compiled. Choose ones that you think the meaning is easy to remember, practise writing of the two- three- character combinations and you should be ok.

Good luck.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/GhappynowappT

Try this chart for first grade kanji - http://learn-japanese.info/kanjifirst.html . Each column is a separate theme. Starting from the far right hand side, the first column is numbers, the second is days of the week, the third is directions and sizes, and the fourth is people and the body. Those four columns alone will give you a solid start.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/baryonic1

Regarding Hiragana/Katakana: What i did at the beginning of japanese was to always have a hiragana/katakana table with me, while doing excerises or simply writing them down to practice them (example: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/hiragana-chart/ but there is a ton of others out there)

I also used a sentence to memorize which row was for which letter. With this method i was getting really quick getting the correct hiragana when writing down sentences. After a while i started knowing each hiragana (and later on katakana) just out of memory until i knew all of them (or nearly all as there are some which are less common)

Regarding Kanji: Don't be afraid of the number of Jōyō kanji or the complexity of some of them. Start with the easy ones to get a feel for the kanji, and work your way through. Writing them down helps a lot, as you are getting used to the shape of each kanji.

My learning strategy now is to just write down the words/kanji i do not know and in case of words breaking them apart into their individual kanji. I found that that helps me a lot more memorizing them, then to just learn them without context/sentence.

It will take a while to get used to the japanese writing system, but don't get that let you down! The effort is really worth it :)

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Faisane

A completely new writing system can be intimidating at first. If you keep at it, you'll probably be surprised how soon things will start looking more familiar.

If writing by hand helps you, that's great. It's certainly not a prerequisite - I've been typing kana (and by extension, kanji) my entire Japanese-learning life, and that has worked fine for me.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/BeauxDiddley

I think this is a great idea, used to use this method to learn etymology. I think I will give it a try because learning to write the kanji is another important part of the language.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Polygl-not

Hiragana is pretty intimidating at first but it'll get easier with time. I'm making flash cards, trying to sound out any written Japanese I see, things like that.

And if you have Steam, some money, and enough of an interest, you can buy an RPG sort of game called Learn Japanese to Survive!: Hiragana Battle. There are games for hiragana, katakana, and even kanji. I bought the game a few weeks ago because hiragana were difficult, and I'm already getting much better at recognizing them. The game teaches you how to write, speak, and read each character one by one; it's really helpful! I think I got it during a sale but I seem to recall it was $9.99 USD.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Borger1735

I haven't tried that. I'll give it a try that sounds like a good idea!

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/NiaCain1

Yes, I am currently learning the same language and it can be tricky and interesting at the same time and its better when you write how to pronounce the words and spell it out will help.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacob310885

The same happened to me at first. There comes a time when you're practicing Japanese and it seems as if you just can't get the grasp of it. But believe me, once you get past that point, it all becomes a breeze. As for me, it took me 4 months to get past that point. But don't give up, it's all worth it and I'm sure you can do better than me.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/leonafrifa92

I found it much easier to write out the charactors in order to remmeber them, I used handwriting templates to help

http://japanese-lesson.com/characters/hiragana/hiragana_writing.html

This site has writing templates for both Hiragana and Katakana, I would just sit and write the charactors over and over again whilst also saying the sound each time and it really helped me.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MaynardHogg

Tracing is good!

June 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AceOfCats

Writing down them down did help me, it is a very good memorization strategy if you are really committed to learning the language. And seeing as you are writing them down, you are doing great! ^w^

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Dcstaats

A language requires you to practice everyday and it is fine to be intimidated because you just need to work at it. Kanji is not easy and I have been learning as well, just keep working at it.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mugicha202

Kanji is a lot. Especially the little characters in the middle or end of them.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/NiaCain1

So bascially just practice and you will get better

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielCortesGP

Yes, writing for me is the best way to memorize something, when you start to learn Kanjis i recomend to you this site - Wanikani, it is a site focus on teache Kanji, check it out

March 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/NiaCain1

Anybody learning spanish

March 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MaynardHogg

Why do you ask? I completed the course, so now am in maintenance mode, using outside resources.

June 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jojo39060

Learning a new language takes time! But it is a cycle of frustration and conquest as your knowledge and fluency grow. Consider: tinycards.duolingo.com for kana drill - the repetition is a great study aid; and Heisig's "Remembering the Kanji" book if you are ready to put in the time.

April 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MaynardHogg

Forget romanization. You won't get very far without learning kana.

Writing? Start by tracing on the screen. Sort of a trial run.

June 26, 2019
Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.