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"Practice makes the master."

Translation:La práctica hace al maestro.

5 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/red_kevin_h

I'm guessing this is parallel to the English phrase, "Practice makes perfect"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Yes, but this translation is a lot less good that "practice makes perfect", I think they put it to help us, but in my opinion they should only accept "practice makes perfect", because with this story of "masters" people are confused.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WimXL
WimXL
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hace al maestro - makes to the master instead of hace el? or is typical use in spanish?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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It's the personal "a" at work, used before any and all persons that are the object of an action.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

"...al Maestro" is correct but "....a La Maestra" is not. Is the word "Master" only translated as a masculine noun in Spanish? Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

learnTACO32, I think this must be a saying, but I sure do like your translation!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

TACO and Melita: Yes, it is a saying and, yes, Spanish is masculine-oriented. It is changing slowly to be more gender-neutral, but I am sure it will be many years before the old sayings are changed. It just wouldn't sound right to say "La práctica hace el maestro o la maestra". :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisgosselin92

The sentence says "practice makes the master" so I used "practica..."

Why does it require it to be "La practica"? That would be "The practice makes the master" and that is a slightly different sentence.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

I think this is a case of a noun being "used in a general sense."

http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/5

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisgosselin92

Ahh thank you for your reply.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roozimmer

Could it be similar to the implied "that" sometimes dropped from English sentences such as: I hope (that) this works?

This is what I assumed after getting it wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisgosselin92

"[I would hope THAT] the practice makes the master." (or whatever clause makes sense for the first part of the sentence).

Seems correct, maybe a native speaker can chime in?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Revolutionnaire
Revolutionnaire
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why is "el maestro" wrong? Only "al maestro"

4 years ago