"L'uomo povero non è adatto."

Translation:The poor man is not suitable.

April 9, 2013

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaxyLady

I translated this as "The poor man is not right" after seeing two instances where "right" was an acceptable answer. Is it maybe incorrect to think of the sentence this way as it could be seen as rude (i.e. he's not right in the head)? I do love learning this language and would not want to accidentally hurt someone's feelings with the wrong words or meanings. :)

April 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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"L'uomo povero" is offensive enough as it is :P It means a man who is poor, rather than a man you're pitying (that would be "il pover'uomo"). As for "adatto" it means to be suitable, fitting or appropriate for some job or role; right is a good translation but it'd need context. "He's not right in the head" would be translated with an idiom like "Non ci sta con la testa" (lit. he's not there with his head) or "è fuori di testa" (lit. he's out of his head).

April 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferynn

Just a precision : "Non ci sta con la testa", why "ci" ? I know it's the pronoun with "Noi" when it's clitic, but in this case, what does it refer to ?

April 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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Yeah, good catch; a lot of particles are recycled in more than one meaning, like "gli" being both article and personal pronoun. In this case "ci" and "vi" besides being personal pronouns can also be adverbs of place, meaning "in it", "in that", "there". I think you already met "c'è" (there is); that's the contraction of "ci è" with the same meaning of ci.

April 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferynn

Mhhhh... SO basically, Italian tries to make sentences as short as possible :-)

Okay, I'll try to remember that then. And yes, I had already met "c'è", but I always assumed it meant something like "it is", and that I could use it to say "c'è un giorno bello." But I guess (if I'm correct though) that you could be able to translate it by "Here is a beautiful day". So that makes sense.

Actually, I'm joking about that, but in French we also have lots of those "shortened" versions. Like for instance I realized earlier that to recall a place "Ne" can be used, and (I'm not sure you are familiar with that, but I'll go ahead and try it anyways), we use "y" to recall places "Nous allons à la plage" = "Nous y allons" (We go to the beach = We go there)

As always, thanks for the feedback.

April 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferynn

You'll see, it can feel quite "easy" because the two languages are fairly similar in many aspects. That's why I'm hoping to learn Italian quite fast, contrary to german which has been a real...let's say pain in the neck the last 12 years :)

If you're hitting any walls when you go into french, be sure that I'd be glad to help you as well.

April 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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I studied some French back in middle school but forgot most of it by now :) I'll probably get to it after I complete my German here. I met "y" mostly in "il y a" and I think the usage must be very close.

April 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/webMan1

Why the difference between "L'uomo povero" and "il pover'uomo"?

May 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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Well, when you say "the poor man" in English you often don't imply poverty, but rather that you're pitying him: for instance, he just broke up and holed up in a bar, you'd say "Leave the poor man alone". In Italian you express that by changing the word order to "il pover'uomo" (o "il poveretto", "il poveraccio", the poor guy).

May 10, 2013
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