"Wir rennen zum Garten."

Translation:We run to the garden.

April 9, 2013

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/A_Canadian_Spy

How do you distinguish zum and zur?

April 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/dittocrystal
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Zur = zu + der Zum = zu + dem

In the sentence, "Wir rennen zum Garten", "zu" is used with the dative case. Because the article of "Garten" is "der", it becomes "dem".

http://german.about.com/library/blcase_dat2.htm

August 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Uberling
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But why is it dative? I thought motion toward something is supposed to be accusative.

April 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dittocrystal
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You are right that accusative is used when showing motion towards something. However, there are some prepositions that are always used with dative. "Zu" is one of them.

April 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Uberling
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Lovely. German drives me nuts! I'm thinking of writing a formal request that they make a few changes...starting with "diers" for ALL nouns, please.

But thanks!

April 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/liroy.hash

Brilliant! Count me in

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/elilla.b
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In all fairness to German, most languages with cases also have things like this. For example, in Latin contra (against) takes the accusative, while cum (with) takes the ablative,

In general it's best not to try too hard to ascribe meanings to cases. Their names, like "accusative", "genitive" etc., reflect the most common use, but far from all of them. Think rather of it in purely mechanical terms: zu makes the nouns it governs go dative, because that's the rule of the game.

July 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/An_droid

It's really frustrating to me because German is so close to being a perfect language. So much of it is well structured, logical, powerful, and beautiful.

If they'd just get rid of noun gendering (an absolutely useless feature that's in far too many languages,) clean up the pronouns, clean up the articles, and make the cases more consistent, it would be possibly the best language in the world :(

August 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremyViet

I don't understand: you're saying that "zu" is always used with dative. So how is it that in some cases we have the word "zum = zu + dem" ? Dem is genitive, isn't it ?

April 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/deborahcrook

Dem is dative, when it applies to a masculine or neuter singular noun. For feminine singular, der is dative, hence zur

May 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremyViet

Sorry, I'm confusing myself. "Zu + dem" is dative. Then what about "Zu + der" ?

April 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/irmingard
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"the yard" is an Americanism. An English speaker does not call a garden a yard.

April 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/myra
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We try to accept US and UK variations. As you point out, "garden" is preferable for "Garten". That's why it's the displayed translation :)

April 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/GuyMiddlet

Why does one of the options include 'garden' and one 'yard'? The answer terms should be consistent.

November 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
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Because "yard" means different things in American and British English.

November 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DarcX
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As an American, I've never referred to a garden as a "yard." To me, a "yard" is more like an open field or something.

July 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ndolovski
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why is the Continous Tense "We are running to the garden" not accepted?

January 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/joe51134

Does Garten mean yard or garden. To me, a yard is the land around your house, and a garden is a spot in your yard to grow flowers or vegetables.

June 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/varigby
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If you are American it means "yard". If you are British it means "garden".

July 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria143237

German is the most beautiful language I like all of it. So powerful and original in my opinion

September 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ji-SeongYi

I'm a non-native English speaker and I wonder what is wrong with my sentence 'we run toward the garden' since it is not accepted by that owl.

June 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JeremyViet

Running "toward the garden" means "in the direction of the garden". But the garden may not necessarily be you final destination: you may stop before it, or you may run across the garden and keep going further to another place.

Running "to the garden" means that the garden is your destination, you'll run until you arrive there and you'll stay a while to enjoy the garden.

June 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PWkXZCsm

Trying to get a sense of "zum". In this context does it mean "to", as in arrive at the entrance of the garden, "towards" as in the direction of, or actually to run "into" the garden as being stood on the grass?

January 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/rharao
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"We run to the back yard"?

September 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/GrgoCroatia
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because that's something different. Garten= garden (or yard as seen the comments under)

November 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aktm87

why it is to the yard not at the yard ????

May 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Keonna384415

The word "zum" is a contraction of "zu dem" which means "to the".

January 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JWsama

If it is like English, "at" means in, on or near, and "to" means toward.

July 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/essam.hassanein

Why is this dativ?! There is movement in the sentence! Shouldn't movement be alwaĆ½s associated with akkusativ?!

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Dutch_Girl

I was confused about this for several minutes too, until I suddenly remembered that "zu" is a dative preposition, meaning that it is always associated with the dative case. It is not one of the prepositions that takes either the dative or the accusative, depending on movement.

December 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/john376507

motion needs acc

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
Mod
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(a) that's "destination of motion", not just "motion". Running (around and around) in a place would be dative despite the motion, for example.

(b) that's true for prepositions that can take either the dative case (for location) or the accusative case (for destination of motion).

zu always expresses destination of motion and so doesn't need to make this distinction; it always takes the dative case.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/OmarRemali

Toll

January 23, 2018
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