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  5. "Selling cars is my job."

"Selling cars is my job."

Translation:Vendre des voitures est mon métier.

April 10, 2013

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alannakdennis

couldnt it be mon emploi? I dont understand whats wrong with mon emploi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dentarthurdent42

From what I've gathered from related responses, "emploi" means something closer to "employment", so it's something you have, as opposed to something you do.

Par exemple: "J'ai un emploi au bureau. Au bureau, mon métier est (to do whatever people do in an office)"

If this is inaccurate, please correct me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaddyJohn

"Mon emploi est vendre des voitures" was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

Vendre des voitures est mon emploi was accepted. Jan. 06/14


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenisBouch7

Mon emploi est vendre des voitures. Accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RQZ.Sash

I typed in "profession" and got wrong. Would like to know why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glat64

Why is vendant incorrect ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EStyrke

I think it's because "selling" in this context is not a verb (as in "I am selling a car"), but a verbal noun (a gerund). In English these two uses have the same form, but not in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kylebacon

Can we use present participles as gerunds?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Present participles and gerunds are two different uses for the same construction (in English).

http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/ing-forms/

Oh, wait, are you asking if that can be done in French? It's a tricky question because what the French call le gérondif isn't really the same thing as what we call a gerund.

This might help: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/presentparticiple_2.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkHopman

What about "Vendre les voitures?" Selling cars is a generalisation, so "les" whould be accepted, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gwildor

In this case I don't think it holds up, because you only sell the cars your company has to offer, not all the cars in the world. I also get the feeling that using le/la/les for generalities is something for starting a sentence, not after a verb (with weekdays like "on fridays" being "les vendredis" being an exception).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WVUPick

I would have to agree that "les" should work, as it is a generalization. He may be referring to his job as in his career, so it may not be exclusive to one dealership or company. Either way, I think that "les" should be accepted, as it is "splitting hairs" to be so picky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cafebustello

Is there a difference between emploi and métier?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yogalina1

why it is incorrect to say 'ma profession'. It's basically the same meaning as mom metier!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryAnne20

I put 'Vendant de voitures est mon travail'. Both 'vendant' and 'de' were marked incorrect. In the previous question it was 'ablum de photos', not 'des'. Can anyone help me with the distinction?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alipaulam

album de photos is a collection of things which forms a whole - like in english you wouldn't say album of the photos, but photo album, the photos modify the album. Also if it's a quantity, like bouteille d'eau, or beaucoup de ..., These features usually mean you say de rather than des - whereas that doesn't apply to 'vendre des voitures'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

"La vente de voitures est mon métier?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sameerxk

Why is "Vendre les voitures" incorrect? It sounds like he does it for a living and in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

You're not making a general statement about cars. You cannot use "les" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaiYourin

Which is better / more correct?

Vendre des voitures est mon métier.

Vendre des voitures, c'est mon métier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

The second uses emphasis by repetition (of the subject). That's more informal than the first. The first is correct in a learning setting. The second you'd hear more spoken in the street.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaiYourin

Thank you. Does that mean that "c'est" is not absolutely required in the common sayings: "Voir, c'est croire", "Tout comprendre, c'est tout pardonner" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

Actually, it’s required in those sentences because the subject and the attribute are both infinitives. There are specific rules for when you’re dealing with infinitives as the subject, as the attribute of the subject, and if the verb is être (or similar).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaiYourin

But "vendre des voitures", which is the subject of the original sentence, is just as much of an infinitive as "tout comprendre", isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

Yes, but the attribute (the stuff described after être) is not an infinitive. I amended my post above to reflect that. Essentially, infinitive + être + infinitive requires “c’est“.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bootsma

My guess was Vendre des autos est mon emploi. Grammatically correct but not typical?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferynn

It is indeed gramatically correct, but not very typical. Yet, I would perfectly understand you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/priyamitter

des voitures ! and i wrote some cars why is it wrong then


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antlane

I think: if you sell 'some' cars you are not a good seller


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica34989

Technically speaking, wouldn't "la vente des voitures, c'est mon boulot" also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

My thought was that "des" is not an indefinite article, but rather a possessive, literally "of the".

So, if this is correct, a word-for-word translation would be:

"The selling OF cars is my job."

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