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https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

Saying Au Revoir to Duolingo

Every day many people say au revoir/good bye to Duolingo, I find this very sad. Giving up at something that could change the way you think write and talk is saddening. When you first commit to a second language, whether on Duolingo or any other place, you are agreeing that no matter how difficult it becomes you will continue learning and hopefully become fluent in the language that you are learning. Any of you out there who think it is getting too hard or just plain tired of learning another language are giving up. NEVER GIVE UP! No matter how hard it gets you will succeed, but in order to succeed you must BELIEVE. Believe that you can do it and you will! Millions of people have already completed the French grammar tree, the Italian tree , and all the other grammar trees. So if millions of other people can do it, why can't you?

4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ddbeachgirl
ddbeachgirl
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I find that it is often three steps forward and two steps back. I have gotten used to it, and don't really look forward to finishing my tree, the more i go back the more the French is sticking with me. There are a number of posts by people that talk about repeating lessons over and over, and they seem to be the successful ones, so I'm going with their tactic! Maybe the quitters will be back once they clear their heads. I just took a 6 day break after 4+ months on DL and it actually did me a lot of good!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boringtomi
boringtomi
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I’m spending more time on practicing than studying new things, hands down. Basically, since I set myself a 50 points per day goal (which I couldn’t do for a few days cause I was sick, but mostly I could), every day, before I even start to look at anything new, or before even looking at the lessons in the currently studied skill, I get at least 50 points in general practice... THEN I practice some lessons from the currently learned skill and THEN I go and take a new lesson...

Every time I finish a skill, I spend a considerable time strengthening it, and then do general practice for days before even starting to consider starting the new skill.... If the skill is too long, I even do general practice between lessons in the skill... That’s where I am now... finished a total of 23 skills, just finished Adverbs(1), so now I’ll be practicing just them, and then general practice for a day or two...

Too slow? I’ve started French from scratch 87 days ago. According to duo I know more than 600 words, and I never had a skill losing even one bar. I believe all that I learned I really know (or at least almost all). I have a friend from Paris and we talk for hours almost entirely in French, and although I can only speak in present tense, it’s amazing me how much I can say and how complicated thoughts I can express to her. I got to the point that I can ask some help from Sitesurf (if you learn French you KNOW who she is) using only French, and in general, I feel I know a lot... After less than 3 months, for me that’s great (I’m at level 21 with very limited immersion and I’ve passed Luis in overall XP count by a 1000 points). I’m happy... I know that some people finished the whole tree in shorter than this time, but - unless they had some strong previous knowledge - I must say I seriously doubt how much they actually use it.

Oh, and one more thing... When I do ANY exercise, I don’t look. If no sound, it means something is there in English or multiple choice, etc, so I do look (but again only at the question) and I don’t go further until I can mentally spell out the full sentence I hear and fully understand it. Even with Duo’s less than ideal robot audio, I do believe it’s a big help in making me learn better. I only had a handful of times that I had to give up and look - and MOSTLY it was some really bad audio issue on Duo’s part...

Of course I’m looking forward to finishing the tree one day, and I will see to it that I do, but I don’t really care. The fun is also in the process, and I feel I’m improving every month, week, even day. Good luck everybody!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SongbirdSandra

Where do you see how many points another person has?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boringtomi
boringtomi
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You can see the points on the weekly/monthly/all-time scoreboard... According to it, you've got 149XP this week, 899XP this month and 8,050XP all time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SongbirdSandra

OK, I didn't realize that you had followed him. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josh1209

Il y a un forum de discussion pour quelqu'un qui apprenait le français de l'anglais? (Native English speaker here, sorry if I butchered that)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor
Ontalor
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Honestly? If people don't want to study, why should they? Sure, a lot of people think it'd be great so speak a foreign language, but if they don't feel like putting the work in and they find it's not something they really want to do, I don't think there's any shame in quitting. Learning a language is a lifelong process, sometimes people just want to try it out and find it's not what they're looking for. You can't hold them to committing to it for life.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbvjshqk017

why, they might be leaving for the other better things.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eeckel
eeckel
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Encouragement is great. I love the support in these conversations. But I just can't assume that everybody who leaves Duolingo is a quitter. Sometimes life happens and something else takes priority. We never know what someone else is going through.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattjking
mattjking
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In order for someone to follow through in the long term, they have to have a goal. I don't think it's a crime for someone to try duoLingo and then stop, if they never really had any goal to begin with. I agree with Ontalor. Sometimes people are just checking things out, seeing what it's like.

Now, when someone is ready to make a commitment- to set a real goal and create a plan to accomplish it, those people are unstoppable. In the meantime, there's nothing wrong with entertaining a little curiosity and checking things out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdoElias

I wanted to give up so many times I can't even count it - but than I told myself - you already gave up too many times in your life before, you are not going to do that again - you are not not so weak. And very slowly I made learning a habit and look at me now - 245 days STREAK :) I am just in the middle of the tree, thats true but I promised myself to finish it in one or max two moths :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boringtomi
boringtomi
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Frankly, I wouldn't make that promise to myself. Quality should come before quantity. If you're at the middle of the tree, there is no reason why you should finish in 1-2 months. That would make you RUSH through all the lessons, probably retaining only a very small portion of what you learn. There is a Chinese saying: Don't be afraid of going slow, but don't stop... Just my 2-pennies worth of thoughts here... Congrats for the 245 days... I'm at 90 days right now (when I start my exercises today that is).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sa_mills

As a counterpoint, trying to learn French with duolingo can be an intensely frustrating experience. Very little of the grammar is explained, the audio is sometimes difficult to understand, the drop-down hints are often wrong or misleading, the required english phrases are awkward and unnatural, the section on past imperfect is a complete mess, etc. etc. etc. So it's understandable that people will give up, as it is a very difficult learning process. I'm not completely down on duolingo, by the way - some aspects of it are very good, and it's free, but it's far from perfect. If it weren't for the tireless work of Sitesurf, duolingo french would be fairly useless past the first few lessons.

Also, while there are millions of registered users, I doubt very much that 'millions' have finished the French tree. Hundreds, sure, thousands, maybe, but no way have a million people completed the french tree.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boringtomi
boringtomi
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Learning a language, especially trying to master it, always needs strong determination. DL is not perfect, far from it, but I do believe it works, especially with the help of the likes of Sitesurf... I haven't got the present imperfect, so I can't comment on that, but for example when it comes to the audio, although definitely far from perfect, I really don't think it's bad to the point it could be said to be useless... Honestly, the whole purpose of me starting to learn French here was to TEST whether DL is able to do the job "as advertised", and although I do find some shortcomings, I do feel it's passing the test with flying numbers so far. I'm about at 1/3 of the tree, and I'm already having HOURS or conversations on skype with my friend who is from Paris, and she can't stop complimenting me on my progress - and I do owe that progress to Duolingo. Having said all that, you're absoultely right, it's not "a game"... it's still a serious studying process, it needs a lot of time, work and determination. So those who start believing that they will just miracleously be able to speak perfect French after "playing on it", they are in for a bitter disappointment...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ddbeachgirl
ddbeachgirl
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I have enjoyed reading your comments, you are an inspiration! The big plus of DL is that it has spawned an incredibly positive and supportive community of language learners, and I see that you are an integral part of it! I believe Luis' vision for DL is for people to learn a new language as organically as we learned our first language, thus the lack of grammar lessons. I am grateful for this approach, I actually don't want to learn too much about grammar, I just want to read and speak French. Practice is key to this approach, just like when we were little.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boringtomi
boringtomi
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Je suis d’accord avec vous, ddbeachgirl, merci beaucoup pour vos gentils mots!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josh1209

I'd like to say that although for the past two years (not currently, unfortunately) I've been enrolled in a formal French class, I like being able to grasp the basics of the concepts before I actually learn them in class. I feel that this helps me by enabling me to ask more important questions, as my French teacher tends to be able to explain the particulars better than she does the basic fundamentals. So I don't expect to become fluent in French from Duolingo alone, but I feel that it is a very good springboard from which one can assimilate even more practical knowledge, especially in the speaking/listening departments. I apologize for bringing up an arguably "dead" thread, but I'd like to add my thoughts, however insignificant.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lamyrtilleverte

Ceci me parle.

4 years ago