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  5. "Aia ʻo ia ma kai o ke alanui…

"Aia ʻo ia ma kai o ke alanui."

Translation:She is seaward of the road.

March 29, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bluthund

Is Hawaiian one of the languages that use directions like seaward, mountainward instead of North, South etc.?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comfy_Cat

There is also "windward" and "leeward"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Everlighta

Hū! He mea u'i! So beautiful :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KealiiHave

It is seaward of the road should also be accepted... He, she, it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KealiiHave

street... road...


[deactivated user]

    I wrote "It is seaward of the road" and was marked incorrect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AudraTresp

    "She is seaward of the road" is the correct way to say it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mak511906

    Is "seaward" even a real word? I've been putting it in quotes (and getting it marked wrong) because it seems like a made-up word - shorter than "toward the ocean" for sure, but WAY less frequently used anywhere - but this program, apparently.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comfy_Cat

    Yes, seaward is a word. It's just used here as an English translation of the word makai.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldArms1

    I agree that either he or it should be acceptable as well as she ... and I also agree that, after living here for many years, I have NEVER heard anyone give local directions and say "upland" or "seaward" ...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comfy_Cat

    I'm sure you've heard people say "mauka" and "makai" when giving directions.

    Here's a small example of that kind of phrasing used in everyday language:

    "… is on the mauka side of Hana Highway and the Hana side of Oheo Gulch."

    Sound familiar now?

    Mauka = upland

    Makai = seaward


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldArms1

    Yes, I understand that ... my point is that people here DO say "mauka" and "makai" ... even if they don't speak Hawaiian. Mauka, makai, aloha, pau have all become commonplace for English speakers in the islands ... and no one that I know of uses upland, inland or seaward ... so my suggestion would be to recognize these words as crossover terms that don't require translation into English forms that sound awkward and are rarely if ever used.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OttoLaari

    The course is for English speakers who have zero knowledge of Hawaiian not for Hawaiian locals who may or may not already know some Hawaiian.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

    There are other people besides people in Hawai'i, and we do sometimes say upland and seaward.

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