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"Diferentes culturas têm diferentes costumes."

Translation:Different cultures have different customs.

May 28, 2014

29 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/todji

Can costumes mean 'clothes' here or does it literally translate only as costume?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No, it does not translate clothes.

Customs = costumes

Costumes = fantasias.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

But notice that "fantasias" are only the costumes that make you pretend to be someone/something else.

If by costumes you mean certain kinds of clothes that are normal to a culture, you should use "roupas" instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Festa à fantasia = costume party, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlennaSol

You mean 'costumes' = fantasias. Easy to mispell it :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelancholicChen

@Paulenrique, did you mean "Costumes = fantasias"??? instead of "customes".

I wrote "different cultures have different costumes" for "Diferentes culturas têm diferentes costumes", it marked my answer as correct. Does it mean "costume" in Portuguese can mean "costume" in English in the same sense???

Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Sorry, it was a typo. I've fixed it! =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelancholicChen

@Paulenrique, thank you.

Now particularly if this is the case, I'm more confused with the rest:

Does it mean "costume" in Portuguese can mean "costume" in English in the same sense???

because I wrote "different cultures have different costumes" for "Diferentes culturas têm diferentes costumes", it marked my answer as CORRECT.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Well, I wouldn't say that =) I think it is a bug on Duo =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

O disfarce (disguise, also camouflage, and mask which comes from masquerade aka a mascarada) seems to be the most used in Portugal.

Loja do Disfarce means costume store. There was one near where I lived that I passed by frequently to see what was on display in the windows. Cheap entertainment. Sometimes I had to take pictures...

Disfarçer is the verb, to disquise (dress up, in a costume, etc.). Mascarar is to mask (máscara is the noun - seem familiar?). Camuflar is to camouflage (camuflagem is the noun).

No fears, they understand fantasia outside of Brazil. :)

.

Mores (two syllables, noun not related to more) is another English word for customs, or ways (habits, behavior, manners, social norms). It is also related to morals.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mores

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Customs (Alfândega) is also the office that collects duties and taxes, tariffs:

  • the official department that administers and collects the duties levied by a government on imported goods.
  • "cocaine seizures by customs have risen this year"
  • the place at a port, airport, or frontier where officials check incoming goods, travelers, or luggage.
  • "arriving refugees were whisked through customs"
  • the duties levied by a government on imported goods.

But they also check for forbidden fruit, and animals as well as drugs.

They are as old as time itself it seems.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Customs

The Portuguese word is actually of Arabic origin (al-fundaq) and means inn or hostel:

https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alf%C3%A2ndega

In places with rivers, wires were strung across to ensure boats stopped to pay entry (and also grab a beer, food, lodging which were all extra – the start of tourism, albeit forced).

Funnily enough, you have to pay to leave Costa Rica. :)

Immigration is where the passport is checked.

.

I used to think it was odd that customer which is related to costs was not spelled as costumer but that is someone who makes and/or sells costumes.

Costume (for dress-up) however if used in Portuguese is because it is a loanword from English.

http://www.linguee.com/portuguese-english/translation/costume.html

http://www.linguee.com/english-portuguese/search?source=english=costume


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yellowred42

Why is the adjective before the noun in both cases? I thought the sentence should be "culturas diferentes tem costumes diferentes"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jackherbach12

acho que voce pode falar isso tambem .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

It could be, and it would have the same meaning. However, in Portuguese the placement of some adjectives can change the meaning sometimes. For examples, "mulher grande" means "big woman", while "grande mulher" means "great woman". (However, usually go for the "noun+adjective" order if you''re in doubt.)

The same applies to "cultura diferente" and "diferente cultura" The first is stressing that the culture is somewhat awkward/stange (we, Brazilians, sometimes use "different" as a polite word for "stange"). Ex. "Você tem uma cultura diferente, né?" [Do you have a different/stange culture, don't ya?"]. Meanwhile, "diferente cultura" is only saying that are not equal. Ex. "Eu cresci numa cultura diferente" [I was raised by a different culture].

The sense would change, though, if you said, "Diferentes culturas têm costumes diferentes" [Different cultures have different/strange costums] or "Culturas diferentes têm diferentes costumes" [Different/Strange cultures have different costums]. So, as long as the "diferente" is in the same place with both words it's "not equal".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmedina721

When would diferente(s) come before the noun and when would it come after? What's the rule for this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

I think in English, it will always be "different culture(s)", so it may be difficult to explain it. However, "cultura diferente" is stressing that the culture is somewhat awkward/stange (we, Brazilians, sometimes use "different" as a polite word for "stange"). Ex. "Você tem uma cultura diferente, né?" [Do you have a different/stange culture, don't ya?"]. Meanwhile, "diferente cultura" is only saying that are not equal. Ex. "Eu cresci numa cultura diferente" [I was raised by a different culture].

However, as for the given example, you could write it both as "Diferentes culturas têm diferentes costumes" and "Culturas diferentes têm costumes diferentes", and it would have the same meaning. The sense would change, though, if you said, "Diferentes culturas têm costumes diferentes" [Different cultures have different/strange costums] or "Culturas diferentes têm diferentes costumes" [Different/Strange cultures have different costums]. So, as long as the "diferente" is in the same place with both words it's "not equal".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EhudRattne

I think in this case, "customs" and traditions" should be interchangeable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Although it can be argued that the two mean the same thing, the two are separate words, so "traditions" would be «tradições».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aliena.84

Hi everyone,

why is "diferentes" with "es" both times, culturas being fem, costumes being mask. ? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

adjectives ending in «-e» are gender-neutral. Therefore, the plural «-es» is also gender-neutral.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/todji

because the word is the same in both masculine and feminine forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/todji

not that that explains much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashilem

why is costumes translated as customs. Customs in this sentence means uses, right? The different uses (as in habits) of cultures..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

There is the word «fantasia» which means "costume," but, yes, here the word «costumes» means "customs," which I would be more inclined to define as "traditions" («tradições»). :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jackherbach12

They're interchangeable for the most part!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danfeve

In my attempt I used traditions, but it was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Right, because «tradições» is a better fit for the word. I was just trying to use a synonym to illustrate the meaning of the word "costums."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jackherbach12

voce tem razao...... it's been a while, I think costumes as in dressing up is feminine and costumes as in customs is masculine. You can google translate to see. If not different genders then they just have different meanings for same gendered word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/POLSKAdoBOJU

How is customs (aduana in Spanish )?

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