1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Portuguese
  4. >
  5. "Nós rimos da minha fala."

"Nós rimos da minha fala."

Translation:We laughed at my speech.

May 28, 2014

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ketoacidosis

"Nós rimos da minha fala." - We laughed at my talk.

I put "We laughed at my speaking," and it was marked as incorrect. What does this mean? We laughed at how I was talking? I gave a talk somewhere (perhaps a talk for TED) and we laughed at that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 111

It can be both:

  • Nós rimos do jeito que eu falo = We laughed at the way I talk.
  • Nós rimos do que eu falei = We laughed about what I said.

Duolingo probably has not foreseen your answer, but if you report it, they will probably accept it as a new option.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ketoacidosis

Hey Daniel, can "fala" be used to mean "palestra" here, or would that change the meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 111

No, "fala" can't mean "palestra".

  • "Fala" is "speech" or "way of speaking" in the sense of "things one say".
  • "Palestra" is a talk in the sense of a "lecture" or any event where a speaker gets an audience and a subject to talk about.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ketoacidosis

Obrigado! I may try that if I come across the question again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes, they would want something like "eles riram da minha maneira de falar". =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ymeagain

Who or what is this TED?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ketoacidosis

Wikipedia article on TED (conference): "TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) is a global set of conferences run by the private non-profit Sapling Foundation, under the slogan "Ideas Worth Spreading".[4] TED was founded in 1984 as a one-off event;[1] the annual conference series began in 1990.[5] TED's early emphasis was technology and design, consistent with its Silicon Valley origins, but it has since broadened its focus to include talks on many scientific, cultural and academic topics.[6]"

Here's a TED talk by Duolingo founder, Luis von Ahn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gglehma

This doesn't make sense in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

"They are laughing at the way I talk" is one common way to say it in the US. I put "...my speech" meaning "my speech pattern.". Try reporting, since DL (and computer programs) are really just rattling machines made by people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenHueb

Uh, let's not forget that 'speech' is a real noun in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

Good point. I edited my comment, since I agree, and think I exaggerated saying speech was technical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Fandey

So, to laugh at = rir de, but to yell at = gritar com? Are these prepositions obligatory to be used like that or are they interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucasFlicky

The structural concept of portuguese preps are a little different from english. If you would literally translate "at" you would get "em", which in portuguese doesnt make any sense. Think it like "laugh of sth" and "yell with sth" While it can sound pretty weird in english, it makes perfect sense in portuguese.

But this indeed has some confusion: "rir com" means that you are laughing together with someone, while "gritar com" can perfectly mean the same, but it is very rare to see it being put that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

Would "gritar juntos" be acceptable/preferable to "gritar com" if the meaning is "to yell together"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 111

They should be like that....

Unfortunately prepositions always come attached to something and they don't translate alone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Fandey

Entendi! Muito obrigado pelas suas respostas!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mdr1001

Terrible translation. We laughed at my talk is not acceptable English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam490

I laugh at the way this sentence is translated to english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_JesusG_

Can "fala" also be voice? "We laugh about my voice"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 111

Not exactly, but the closes is "the way one talks".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucasFlicky

Notice that "rimos" can be both "laughed" (past) and "laugh/s" (present continuous). Both are 100% correct for this sentence

Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.
Get started