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"Tu as pu y aller ?"

Translation:Were you able to go there?

4 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/movingsouth

Wouldn't we normally use "Were you able to go there?" or "Could you go there?" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
ag3n7_z3r0
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"Could you go there?" is accepted, it's what I put.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Yes, of course. This particular sentence gives us an opportunity to demonstrate that "aller" requires a complement ("y") but it need not be translated into English, i.e., "Could you go?" works just as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianLionel113
BrianLionel113
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But it isn't accepted as a correct translation by the system

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Fixed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianLionel113
BrianLionel113
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Great, thanks for fixing that little issue...you make it easier for us to learn and your explanations are also quite useful, thanks for those too. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WordJigsaw
WordJigsaw
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Wouldn't that be 'have you been being able'? Regardless, I think that as 'to be able' is the infinite, the present perfect must be 'to have been able'. Using ' could' avoids the problem. I think the other two options you suggested should be correct, though :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/movingsouth

You are correct that "I have been" uses the correct past participle and is the present perfect. So "You have been able" is grammatically correct. My mistake. I've edited my earlier entry to avoid confusion for others.

But I think both "You were able" and "You have been able" are acceptable translations into English of "Tu as pu", although we tend to be specific about when we use each of them: "You were hot" (at that time) and "You have been hot" (at some time) have clearly different meanings.

So my feeling here is that "You were able to go there" (at that time) is the likely meaning of the French whereas it is hard (but not impossible) to think of situations in which you would want to say "You have been able to go there" (at some time and not at others).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Unless you are using a form of "avoir été" + verb or an expression using "depuis que", then the normal Passé composé "Tu as pu" would not translate to "you have been able" but "you were able" or inverted, "were you able".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShubhamGup411396

OK, what exactly is 'y' used for??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zipzoo

In this instance, it is used to refer to a place, or 'there' specifically. "Could you go there," versus "Could you go"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AidanBarry

thank you

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mutti6
mutti6
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where is "there" in this sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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It doesn't get a lot of attention, but the verb "aller" needs to have a complement. Without the mention of the place one is going, the tiny word "y" is used to refer to it. It generally is not translated into English, i.e., "Were you able to go?" is quite correct without adding "there".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phfaucon
phfaucon
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That's a brilliant explanation. It makes it really clear to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phfaucon
phfaucon
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"Y" stands for whatever place you intended to go, so a simple translation is "there"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielle562695

Just needed to say that this one really annoyed me. That is all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GloriaUrba

Could verses can in this case ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiguelGarc756115

I just pick the words by instint. I know if had to write everything from scratch it would be way harder.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gaiagoddess

What is wrong with "Have you been able to go there?" (Marked as incorrect)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boydell

Could you have gone there?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chriswalli8

Just to be difficult, why isn't this tu y as pu aller?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobWarning

Why isnt y contracted with aller here? Like y'aller instead of y aller.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlosCast685392

Why not "Would you go there"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Your sentence is present conditional tense, not compound past. "Would you go there?" means something like "would you go there if you were able to?" The original sentence, "Tu as pu y aller ?" means were you able to go (there)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phfaucon
phfaucon
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Because it lacks the idea of "being able".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christill81

Why not 'you can go there?' ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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"You can go there" is present tense. "Tu as pu y aller ?" is Passé composé referring to an action that took place in the past.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed.Re

If ihear that sentence in a conversation one day, am I supposed to be able to understand it , look at it the words are all just one letter and they mix together as if they are forming a real word , how the hell do the French understand each other, how do they recognize the m' and the y and the les, maybe it was wrong to choose French to learn

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucas-wilkins

I'm very confused by this.

2 years ago