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  5. "Io ho fame."

"Io ho fame."

Translation:I am hungry.

April 11, 2013

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosiePants

I am new to the language I don't understand how Io ho fame= I am hungry instead of I have hunger


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick10213

In other languages, hunger is a quality that you have rather than a state you are in. You "have the quality of hunger;" in that sense, you are right. But to translate that directly into English would be irrational because we don't talk like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Wonho

I put in 'I have hunger' and got it right... I am hungry is the main answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave426966

I wrote I have hunger too, but got it wrong. Why is "I am hungry" not "Io sono fame"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

In English, we say "I am hungry", the adjective. In Italian, they say "Io ho fame (I have hunger)", the noun. Different languages say things differently. It's about translating it into how it's said in that language, not word-for-word substitutions. It just doesn't work that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rsalv1

i love your tardis!!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curious_Soul

You can say "(Io)Sono affamato/a" - I am hungry or "Ho fame- literally I have hunger. Both mean the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomasGerbi1

"Io sono fame" literally means "I am hunger."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nesreen133964

what does fame means exactly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julianne356

I remember hunger because "fame" sounds and looks a bit like "famished".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

Yes, they come from the same root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

It's the noun "hunger".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisagnipura

Ciao Rosie: "Io ho fame" literally means "I have hunger", but that is just not the way English speakers say it, so it is translated as "I am hungry".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricardodgarciag

It is exactly the same with Spanish. We do not say: Yo soy hambre/ yo estoy hambre; and that would be the direct or exact translation for: I am hungry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unpetitoiseau

It's the same in french, we say "La femme a faim“ for" La donna ha fame"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarvinMenjivar

It was the rule I used to answer this exercise lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nawelzaatout

me too , j'ai faim or io ho fame


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeraMoore

In spanish you would say Tengo hambre


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felo740

But in Spanish is correct to say both "Estoy hambriento (I'm hungry)" and "Tengo hambre (I have hunger)".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nanayvirix

We don't say "estoy hambriento" it is not common


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gwydda

Exactly. You would say "estoy hambriento" only when you want to sound funny. It's kind of like saying "I'm feeling esurient". Technically not wrong but no one would normally use it. For a second language speaker to pull of an unusual phrase is difficult, it just sounds like they don't know the normal phrase. Unless they are like so so so clearly very very good in the second language - until then better to stick to the normal language use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vctor145006

Also in dutch: 'Ik heb honger'. So basically english is the only one using the verb 'to be' instead of 'have'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

I have a friend who is a native Dutch speaker, and he says that you can say ik ben hongerig. It is grammatically correct and means something real, but it implies serious scarcity-level going hungry. When he was a child and tried to say "ik ben hongerig", his grandmother would remind him that she lived through the Great Depression and "wij waren hongerig" but "je hebt honger".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jadre24

Althought in spanish we can say: Yo estoy hambriento. Could there be a direct translation in italian for this phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pepbob

Sono affamato


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mgrzddn

"I have hunger" as "io sono affamato"? Questa potrebbe essere la traduzione migliore


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gwydda

It's like saying "I'm edacious". Technically not wrong but it's not a 'neutral' phrase like "I'm hungry". If you say it you're not just saying that you're hungry but you're also sending other messages ("look, I have a big vocabulary / I'm funny / etc.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MimmoP2

Io ho una nuova lingua e non capisco come


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flappin

Like in french; I am hungry = J'ai faim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie97

I love how Italian is so similar to English! Fame=hungry

Fame is similar to our word famine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

It is because English, Italian and many other European languages all derive from Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

The Romance languages come from Latin: French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian. English is actually a Germanic language, but it does take a lot of vocabulary from various Romance languages (most notably French).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankmazuca

don't forget that the Normans (who were Scandinavians who settled in Normandy) spoke French, as did the royalty & nobility for some time in England.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

Yes, that's exactly how English got much of its non-Germanic vocabulary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

@kered9:

I am pretty sure it is the other way around. Europe relied on England so heavily that their languages all devolved from English

As someone who has studied linguistics and the history of languages, as well as having a passing familiarity with the history of Europe, I have to say sorry, but that's completely wrong. Until a few hundred years ago, English was a low-status Germanic language. It is a mutt of a language because it's absorbed the vocabulary of all of its invaders. If other languages have English borrowings, those are much more recent and far, far fewer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankmazuca

this is also why English is such a hard language for non english speakers (or english speakers, in my case) to learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathalyRincon

El inglea no deriva del latin deriva del idioma anglosajon, los idiomas "romances" es decir derivados del latin son español, italiano, frances y portugues, es por esto que estos cuatro idiomas se parecen tanto, y nos es mas facil a los hispano hablantes aprenderlos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

No, English does not derive from Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankmazuca

There are Latin roots in English as the Romans occupied the Britannia. As there are are French roots, German, Danish, etc. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_and_Latin_roots_in_English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

I know, but the language itself doesn't derive fom Latin. French, Spanish, Italian, Catalan, Portuguese do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankmazuca

i understand (io capsico)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/u6c00

or famished!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Wonho

Lol. Point Proven!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sorren8

if you have noticed many words around the world are based off of latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brittany20

That is because they share the same Latin root word "fames" meaning "I hunger"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

This form is also used to say "I am thirsty", "I am afraid", etc.

(I am hungry. = Ho fame.) (I am thirsty. = Ho sete.) (I am afraid. = Ho paura.)

If anyone knows more examples, I will add them to the list. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dian_Kartika

Can I shorten it to be "ho fame"? Will it still have the same meaning with I'm hungry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aditya92

This is just like in German, when they say "Ich habe Hunger". It literally means I have hunger, even though it is "I am hungry" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cklizzy

It occurred to me that this makes a lot more sense when your native language isn't English, or when you speak other languages - like German, where you can also say "I have hunger". Takes a bit getting used to when you learn Italian from English, and English isn't your native language...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drunken_Sailor

Non di pane soltanto vive l’uomo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrugeshkarnik

Why is 'il fame' incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

Because for one, you're saying "the hunger," and for another, "hunger" is feminine and would be "la fame."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/al3xbr

When you speak it, do you connect Io and ho like "i-o fame" or do you literally say "io ho fame"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Expound1

When pronouncing, should I pronounce 'Io' and 'ho' separately or combine them as one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iamacowgil

Ho is have. So why is this sentence "io ho fame" because that would mean "I have hungry"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

The idiom in the Romance languages is "to have hunger/thirst" rather than "to be hungry/thirsty". fame is the noun "hunger" not the adjective "hungry".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bazarunet

So saying "Io fame" wouldn't be correct to say i'm hungry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

No, you need a verb there. Either Io ho fame or Ho fame is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kim314788

I have hunger=I am hungry. This is why I like languages, they express something in a way I have never thought of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meluce

why not i have hungry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

In English we say "to be hungry" (adjective). In Italian, they say "to have hunger" (noun).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melmel996070

I get confuse on (ho) and (ha)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

It's how the verb conjugates.

AVERE (irregular)
io ho
tu hai
lui/lei ha
noi abbiamo
voi avete
loro hanno


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeringDK

I have tried to write ho fame, but duolingo insists on io ho fame. Why is that? Why can't I leave io out as in '(io) ho un libro'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

ho fame really ought to be accepted. There is nothing special about this or ho un libro. You might have had an extra space somewhere or it might have glitched.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeringDK

Grazie, Rae!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/antrozito

I was marked wrong for saying, "i have hunger".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2566

Because translation is not word substitution. In English, we say "I am hungry".

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