https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Question about the sentence ''Det skjer ikke''

Is this only used to mean that something is not occuring in the present time or is it used also to say ''It is not going to happen/it is not happening/that is not going to happen'' (in the future sense)*?

*like, to ensure that something is not going to happen in the future.

I don't know if my question makes sense but I don't know how to explain it better, sorry.

Takk og god helg!

April 13, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

Yes, it is often used in the future 'sense'. Often when saying that you are refusing to let or make something happen.

'Sjefen vil at jeg skal jobbe ekstra i morgen, men det skjer ikke!'

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Often when saying that you are refusing to let or make something happen.

Yes, that's exactly what I meant.

It's clearer now. Tusen takk!

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

Ingen problem! Som vanlig er det bare gøy å hjelpe :)

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Takk, så hyggelig av deg! Du er svært snill som vanlig og forklaringen din er til stor hjelp. Du er veldig hjelpsomt.

I don't know if what I've written is correct, but I am trying :)

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

Helt rett bortsett fra en liten ting: 'Du er veldig hjelpsom*'

God helg!

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

True, hjelpsomt is in the neuter form, right?

Igjen, takk for hjelpen!

God helg!

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

'Hjelpsomt' is the neuter form, yes. Could also be an adverb - 'helpfully'.

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mysmallworld

Good to know, takk!

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian442793

I think there is a third way to understand the sentence, referring to something that's unlikely. "Pigs don't go to school. That doesn't happen." So, here, it's not referring to present or future time as such, but more to what possibly can happen or habitually doesn't happen.

I've got a feeling that this sort of usage might be labelled a "gnomic present tense" by older grammarians. So, if you have a proverbial expression like "Too many cooks spoil the broth", you're not talking about something happening in the present there either, but you're setting down a general rule.

In ancient Greek, the past ("aorist") tense is sometimes used in a gnomic sense.

April 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

In other words, 'Det skjer ikke' kan mean the same as 'Det skjer aldri', in which the gnomic aspect, 'general truth', is clearly used.

April 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian442793

Ok, I hope a native speaker will correct me, but I think in Norsk people sometimes use the present tense with a future meaning, and that this is key to karasu4's example. I mean, I think "det skjer ikke" in his/her example is equivalent to "det vil ikke skje", and by making a statement about the future in a context where the audience knows that it's not really 100% sure, you imply that you'll act to stop it happening.

April 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

Sometimes we use the present tense in a future sense, but more often we express the future with 'skal' or 'kommer til å'.

An example where we would use the present tense where English would use will + inf.: 'Jeg er der om 5 minutt' - 'I will be there in 5 minutes'.

I also often say 'Det kommer ikke til å skje' when saying that I'm not going to let something happen.

April 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian442793

“Jeg er der om fem minutterl is an interesting example, because you can also say that in English! Another example, "I'm definitely going to the Justin Bieber concert with you. I want to see him cry about water on the stage. Just let me know the date, and I'm there."

In fact, you can say something like, "I'm already there" in English to mean that you'll be there ASAP.

I think that it's perhaps more natural in Norsk, though. In English, it comes across as unusual use of speech for rhetorical emphasis.

April 14, 2019
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